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DISPLAYING POSTS TAGGED: education (6)

Alpine School interviews at Alps Bioscan

Author
by Priscilla
Publish date
7 January 2014
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Priscilla is a Program Coordinator for Life Sciences and works on education programs at Melbourne Museum.

In 1914 and 1915, scientists and field naturalists explored the Alpine region of Victoria. Nearly one hundred years later, we sent our museum's ornithologists, herpetologists, mammalogists, entomologists, palaeontologists, and others out into the field to explore, discover, and record the wildlife – alive and fossilised. This recent expedition in November last year, called the Alpine Bioscan, was a collaboration between Museum Victoria and Parks Victoria to perform a major wildlife census in the eastern region of Victoria’s Alpine National Park, with 100 experts taking part.

black and white photo of men on horses Men and horses during the survey of the Alpine area in 1914 and 1915.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

People with malasie trap Today’s scientists: Mel Mackenzie, MV’s Marine Invertebrate Collection Manager, and Parks Victoria staff inspecting a Malaise trap in the Alps. Malaise traps catch flying insects.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We’ll never know exactly the thoughts and experiences of those early researchers in the black and white photographs – but to ensure that doesn’t happen again, we invited eight students from the Alpine School to become Bioscan Ambassadors. Their role was to interview our scientists, record it and share it. The response from the students was overwhelming; all 45 students in the school wanted to participate. The lucky eight had their names pulled from a hat.

So, on the afternoon of November 28th, I went with MV historian Rebecca Carland to the Alpine School to work with the students and their teacher Nicola. The students learned from Bec how to interview a scientist, what makes a good question, and how to plan and record an oral history to make an interview clip. When they learned that their clips may become a permanent part of the museum’s collection, two students nearly cried with happiness.

eight students at table The eight Bioscan Ambassadors, workshopping their ideas for interviewing the scientists.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

On day two of the project, the students and the scientists met at Omeo Memorial Hall. The students' training put them in good stead for the realities of filming in the field – dealing with difficulties like not being able to film outside due to the rain, bad acoustics, and even unflattering lighting. But, like pros – they pushed on, filming and questioning scientists through the challenges.

Four people around a computer Students editing their clip with assistance from Bec Carland, MV historian and Roger Fenwick, Manager Regional Operations, Parks Victoria.
Image: Heath Warwick
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The result was four great video interviews of Museum Victoria scientists which are now on the Making History channel on Vimeo. In another century, when people look back at the photographs of today’s scientists in the field and wonder who these people were, the students’ films will show them.

This project was supported by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development’s Strategic Partnership Program.

Links:

Interview with Mel Mackenzie

Interview with Mark Norman

Interview with Rolf Schmidt

Interview with Ken Walker

In-Flight at the Royal Children’s Hospital

Author
by Alex
Publish date
25 March 2013
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Alex Price is a Programs Officer at the Immigration Museum. She has a passion for Cultural Diversity education and Early Learning.

In celebration of Cultural Diversity Week, the Immigration Museum Education and Community Programs team took the In-Flight installation to the Royal Children’s Hospital on Tuesday 19 March 2013.

Originally part of the Another Country artist in residence series held at Immigration Museum, In-Flight is an installation conceived by Filipino-born and Brisbane-based artists Isabel and Alfredo Aquilizan.  The installation references a transitional place of leave-taking and homecoming and due to popular demand, it has continued to grow in the second floor foyer of the Immigration Museum.

group of people sitting around a table making planes from recycled material In-Flight at the Immigration Museum
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria

Visitors are invited to rummage through recycled plastic bottles, cardboard boxes, felt, string, icy-pole sticks and much more to gather materials to make a mini aeroplane. Once completed, the planes are taken home or added to the large overhead structure. Constructions range from conventional bi-planes to more creative interpretations of the most common form of transport used to immigrate today.

The Education Institute of the Royal Children’s Hospital invited the Immigration Museum to partner with them during Cultural Diversity Week by setting up a smaller scale version of the installation in their ‘Main Street.’ 

I assisted and spent a day at the hospital meeting families and encouraging them to participate. We brought two big containers of assorted materials, scissors, elastic and string but no stickytape or glue were allowed, in keeping with the original concept to encourage creative thinking.

children working on in-flight In-Flight at the Royal Children’s Hospital
Image: Alex Price

Children who created aeroplanes included those visiting outpatient clinics as well as long term patients who came down from the wards. Some spent over an hour making planes, assisted by their relatives who had come to visit, and the hospital teachers.  Five children from the Early Learning Centre also joined in and departed excitedly with their creations.

plane made from recycled material In-Flight at the Royal Children’s Hospital
Image: Alex Price

Visitors to the hospital were encouraged to also come along to the Immigration Museum and participate in the larger In- Flight installation, an ongoing and ever-changing activity.

Links:

In-flight at the Immigration Museum

Top Designs 2012

Author
by Lauren
Publish date
13 June 2012
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Lauren coordinates the Top Designs program at Melbourne Museum.

As Top Designs 2012 enters its final weeks at Melbourne Museum, I'd like to share some of the highlights of this year's exhibition and programs. We say it every single year, but if it's possible, it really did seem like the best Top Designs yet. I was so impressed by everything on display, it is astonishing to think that teenage designers created these beautiful pieces while balancing the many pressures of VCE.

Woman in red cape Red Riding Hood inspired garment designed and constructed by Stephanie Wake.
Source: VCAA
 

I love Stephanie Wake's hand-felted Red Riding Hood cape (so stylish it made the front cover of mX), George Meek's copper, steel and resin chess pieces are beautifully crafted, and Kyle Hui's architectural model and Berlin stamp set are absolutely stunning.

chess set by George Meek George Meek’s Architecture Themed Chess Set, created for Design and Technology.
Source: VCAA
 

architectural model by Kyle Hui Kyle Hui’s architectural model for Visual Communication and Design Unit 4
Source: VCAA
 

As always, the exhibition was accompanied by an education program for secondary students currently or soon to be studying VCE design. The thousands of Victorian students who attended the forums received advice and information about their studies, as well as inspiring presentations by innovative Melbourne designers sharing their experiences of professional practice. I loved sitting in and listening to the presentations – it was fascinating to hear how engineers tested the foundations of the proposed Nakheel Tower in Dubai, how a film director worked with the Aboriginal community of Fitzroy Crossing to make a beautiful film that screened in festivals from New York to Prague, or how you design and apply a 70 metre long sticker to the side of a Boeing 747! Now that the education program is all wrapped up for 2012, we will continue to share tips, insights and information with our Top Designs community via our Facebook fanpage.

Filmmaker Dominic Allen behind the camera Filmmaker Dominic Allen spoke to Media – Film students in our education forums.
Source: Clint Peloso
 

This year I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to make a short film about Top Designs with Robert Zugaro, an RMIT film student interning with the museum. It was so inspiring and entertaining to interview students selected for Top Designs 2012, who really are such clever, creative and charming young people. I also spoke with a couple of superstar Top Designs alumni, Chris Murphy and Genevieve Kulesza, about their experiences in the design industry beyond VCE. Robert has done a wonderful job creating the film, and I'm very excited to think of all the aspiring Top Designers who will watch it and start working towards work to submit for Top Designs 2013.

 

Watch this video with a transcript

Chat with an astronaut

Author
by Pennie Stoyles
Publish date
22 September 2011
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Today, students from Spotswood Primary School attended Scienceworks to participate in an online conference with NASA astronaut, Rex Walheim. Rex is in Australia as a guest of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) to launch their new exhibition Star Voyager, Exploring Space on Screen.

To coincide with the launch, the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development organised an online conference using their Elluminate software. Rex was speaking to students in the ACMI theatre at Federation Square. Scienceworks' Program Coordinator, Bronwyn Quint organised for Spotswood PS students to participate in the session which was projected onto the big screen in the Auditorium. MV Astronomer, Dr Tanya Hill was also on hand to answer questions from the Spotswood students.

Bron & Tanya Bron Quint and Tanya Hill preparing for the online conference (fingers crossed that the technology works).
Image: Pennie Stoyles
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Dr Tanya Hill answering questions from Spotswood PS students Dr Tanya Hill answering questions from Spotswood PS students.
Image: Pennie Stoyles
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Over 100 other schools throughout the state also participated. Many questions were submitted throughout the 45-minute session and those that could not be answered by Rex during the presentation will be posted on the DEECD website.

Astronaut Rex Walheim Astronaut Rex Walheim answering student questions via online conference.
Image: Pennie Stoyles
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We've lent a number of objects to ACMI for the Star Voyager exhibition, including a space glove, a large number of magic lantern slides, a urine collection device and an altitude and azimuth instrument.

Altitude and Azimuth Instrument Altitude and Azimuth Instrument - Troughton & Simms, London, circa 1836 (ST 022216)
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Links:

Rex Walheim's Biography

Star Voyager, Exploring Space on Screen.

MV Blog: Lost in Space

Smashing good time

Author
by Bronwyn Quint
Publish date
11 August 2011
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Bronwyn is Scienceworks' Program Coordinator for Physical Science.

On Wednesday 3 August 2011, 55 teams of young engineers in years 8 and 9 brought bridges of their own design, built by themselves using a kit of materials supplied by Aurecon to Scienceworks. There they loaded the bridges to breaking point to see whose bridge could carry the greatest load. Made from balsa wood, string, cardboard and glue, the bridges were very diverse with many having interesting designs.

Bridge-building teams in Scienceworks Amphitheatre Bridge-building teams in Scienceworks Amphitheatre waiting for their chance to have their bridges tested.
Image: Bronwyn Quint
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Bridges were weighed on arrival and the teams registered and photographed. At noon the testing started. Bridges were judged on not only the load they carried but also their aesthetics, workmanship and creativity. A formula was then used to give each bridge a score out of 50 based on the weight of the bridge, the weight supported, the maximum weight carried by a bridge on the day and the aesthetics score.

Testing the Kaniva College mixed team bridge Testing the Kaniva College mixed team bridge under the watchful eye of The Hon Dr Denis Napthine MP.
Image: Bronwyn Quint
Source: Museum Victoria
 

A fun day was had by all who attended with prizes being awarded by The Hon Dr Denis Napthine MP (Minister for Major Projects) who chatted with many of the teams present.

The winning teams in 2011 were:

  • 1st    Kaniva College (mixed) 115.5kg
  • 2nd   Kaniva College Girls’ team 100.2kg
  • 3rd    Leibler Yavneh College (boys) 78.0kg

Tintern Girls Grammar team with their innovative bridge Tintern Girls Grammar team with their innovative bridge and The Hon Dr Denis Napthine MP.
Image: Bronwyn Quint
Source: Museum Victoria
 

A new prize, the Aurecon Innovation Award (sponsored by Major Projects Victoria), went to Tintern Girls Grammar with a stylish pink bridge modelled on the Golden Gate bridge.

The two Kaniva College teams pose with their winning cheques and The Hon Dr Denis Napthine MP The two Kaniva College teams pose with their winning cheques and The Hon Dr Denis Napthine MPpose with their winning cheques and The Hon Dr Denis Napthine MP.
Image: Bronwyn Quint
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Kaniva College have now made it a hat trick winning the last three years of the Aurecon Bridge Building Competition.

Links:

MV News: Aurecon Bridge-building Competition (2010)

MV News: Breaking bridges (2009)

Aurecon Bridge-building Competition

Making History with the experts

Author
by Jan M
Publish date
18 April 2011
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This guest post is from Jan Molloy, a teacher who now works at the Immigration Museum. She develops education programs and works on partnership projects with schools.

How do you bring a gaggle of students from across Victoria together with prominent historians into one classroom? Virtually, that’s how!

Making History is an interactive website where students can research their community’s history, interact with professional historians and access Museum Victoria’s online collection. By sharing research and stories on the Making History channel, students will showcase their work while contributing to the knowledge and collections of the museum. Making History is a collaboration between the DEECD, Museum Victoria and the Public History Department at Monash University. It will launch in June 2011 but in March we held two pilot online sessions.

On Friday 25 March, Professor Graeme Davison spoke with more than 40 students from Maffra Secondary College, Fairhills High School and ,Sacred Heart College, Kyneton and the Victorian School of Languages, about his work as a historian. He answered questions from the virtual floor for over an hour, using the web to link the computer lab at Melbourne Museum to classrooms across Victoria. Students moved from personal queries like:

If you got to own one of the things in a museum what would it be?

to

What happens when you have something at home that looks old but you don’t know its history and no one in your family does?

  Making History screenshot Screenshot from Making History pilot session.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

In a second session on 30 March, Dr. Seamus O’Hanlon  responded to questions in a virtual classroom of over 100 students. Our very keen Year 9s from Maffra and Fairhills Secondary Colleges returned and were joined by students from Castlemaine North Primary School, Tongala PS, Kyabram P-12 and Lalbert Primary School. Their questions ranged from:

Why do you like your job as an historian?

to

How do you research the history of a building without using the internet?

  Screenshot Making History Screen shot from the Making History pilot session: Seamus tours students around a site about architectural history.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The participating students were inspired by their chats with Seamus and Graeme and were keen to start their own research. We look forward to seeing some fantastic work from these students.

Links:

History education resources

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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