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DISPLAYING POSTS TAGGED: festival (6)

MIFF returns to the Melbourne Planetarium

Author
by Warik
Publish date
16 July 2012
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Warik is a digital production designer at the Planetarium at Scienceworks.

The Melbourne International Film Festival returns again to the Melbourne Planetarium to show the latest works in Fulldome Cinema. Two Fulldome Showcases will be presented on Saturday 4 August.

Coral Coral: Rekindling Venus promotional photograph.
Source: Lynette Walworth
 

7.00pm screening:
• Visualiszt
A series of short immersive works inspired by the music of 19th century Hungarian composer and piano virtuoso Frank Liszt

• Space Opera
Journey through the solar system accompanied by English composer Gustav Holst's acclaimed composition 'The Planets: Opera 32'.

9.00pm screening:
Life: A Cosmic Story
Narrated by Academy Award winner Jodie Foster, the show launches the audience on a journey through time, witnessing key events since the Big Bang that set the stage for life.

Coral: Rekindling Venus
Journey into a mysterious realm of fluorescent coral reefs, bioluminescent sea creatures and rare marine life and uncover a complex community living in the oceans most threatened by climate change. Coral: Rekindling Venus is the new film from acclaimed artist Lynette Wallworth, who also created the Welcome video installation at the Immigration Museum's Identity exhibition.

For further information, or to purchase tickets, head over to the MIFF website.

Links:

Fulldome Showcase at the Melbourne Planetarium

Melbourne Planetarium

Sweet tidings

Author
by Elise Murphy
Publish date
10 May 2012
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Sweet talker Elise Murphy is working with Emily Kocaj to organise the Sweets festival and exhibition. Elise is responsible for community festivals at the Immigration Museum and has a very sweet tooth.

The power of sweets to bring people together was affirmed on Sunday 18 March at the Immigration Museum, as over 2,255 visitors flocked to the Sweets festival and launch of the Sweets: tastes and traditions from many cultures exhibition. Six months in the making, the festival and exhibition showcased the satisfying results of collaboration between the Museum and the Indian, Italian, Japanese, Mauritian and Turkish communities in Victoria.

Indian dancers Sweets for the Gods, Tara Rajkumar’s Natya Sudha Dance Company
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Heidi Victoria, Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier and Assisting the Premier with the Arts, opened the sugar-fuelled occasion. Luscious treats made by community groups and local business owners showcased our rich cultural heritage alongside commissioned dance and music performances, cooking demonstrations from community members and stories, objects and films in the exhibition. By the end of the day, there wasn't a single sweet left in the Museum.

Women looking at exhibition showcase Heidi Victoria (second from left) viewing the Sweets exhibition with community members and MV staff.
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Turkish and Italian sweets Left: Visitor sampling Turkish sherbet | Right: Italian sweets stall
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

It was a delight to see intercultural and intergenerational exchanges sparked by simple acts of sharing sweets and memories. "Energising, uplifting and reassuring," as Patricia Kimtia, President of the Cultural Historical Association of Rodriguans & Mauritians, suggests, "such richness and positive interaction restores hope that the fabric of our society is stronger than one may think and the sense of community prevails."

Women performing a Japanese tea ceremony Japanese tea ceremony demonstration with wagashi sweets
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Although the festival was a special one-day event, the exhibition will run until 7 April 2013 with opportunities for all to visit and share stories and recipes. The sweetest taste, the enriching experience of collaborating with community members and colleagues on this intercultural project, is one that will linger much longer.

Visitors enjoying sweets at the festival Visitors enjoying sweets at the festival
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Sweets festival and exhibition

Author
by Elise Murphy
Publish date
14 March 2012
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Sweet talker Elise Murphy is working with Emily Kocaj to organise the Sweets festival and exhibition. Elise is responsible for community festivals at the Immigration Museum and has a very sweet tooth.

There is only one day to go before the Sweets: tastes and traditions from many cultures exhibition opens and five days until the Sweets Festival takes place at the Immigration Museum.

The team have been very busy installing the exhibition over the past two weeks and it is looking fantastic. Each of the communities represented – Indian, Italian, Japanese, Mauritian and Turkish – have a display showcasing their beautiful cooking implements and serving objects. Delicate Turkish coffee cups with intricate designs sit alongside Italian marzipan fruits and elegant Japanese models of wagashi, which would convince anyone that they were the real thing!

Sweets exhibition installation A showcase from the Sweets: tastes and traditions from many cultures exhibition.
Image: Emily Kocaj
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Final touches are being put to the recipe wall, featuring home-made recipes created by the communities. You'll be able to jot down the ingredients for a syrupy, nutty baklava and learn how to make boondi ladoos, a favourite Indian sweet of Lord Ganesha. We've left space for you to leave some of your own favourite sweets recipes too.

It has been wonderful seeing the exhibition and festival come together over the last couple of weeks and to see all the ideas generated with the communities come to life. We hope that you will feel inspired to cook some recipes or sample a sweet at the Melbourne establishments that specialise in them – many of which you will find at the Sweets Festival this Sunday.

On festival day, we advise skipping breakfast to tuck straight into a mouth-watering array of sweet (and savoury) confections – from bites of nougat and tastings of sour cherry sherbet to baklava available by the piece or the half kilo. Enjoy plenty of other tempting performances, cooking demonstrations and workshops that will get your tastebuds dancing.

Do you really need another excuse to come along and immerse yourself in whole new realms of sweetness?

We'll give you a whole table full!

Sweet treats from five cultures Sweet treats from the five participating communities.
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Sweet talk

Author
by Emily Kocaj
Publish date
14 February 2012
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Sweet talker Emily Kocaj is working with Elise Murphy to organise the Sweets festival and exhibition. She manages community exhibitions at the Immigration Museum and delights in tasting sugary creations from around the world.

The Immigration Museum is working on something very special and super sweet. For the last few months we have been collaborating with five sweets-loving Victorian communities to create Sweets: tastes and traditions from many cultures, a delicious exhibition and festival that are part of the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival and Cultural Diversity Week in March 2012.

Sweets festival Sweets logo.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Members of the Indian, Italian, Japanese, Mauritian and Turkish communities have come together with the museum to jointly explore the historical and cultural significance of sweets. This unique project has seen us sharing sweet stories, traditions and recipes with the communities, not to mention fantastic creations from their kitchens!

Committee members with an array of sweets. Sweets committee members enjoying an array of sweets.
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The community representatives have delighted each other (and us) with a steady stream of treats at each Sweets committee workshop – from crisp, syrupy baklava, tangy limone tiramisu, cloud-like mochi, rose-scented gulab jamun, gorgeous pink napolitains and numerous other delicious morsels.

  Five international sweets Five delicious sweets from the countries and communities featured in the Sweets festival and exhibition. Clockwise from top left: Italian tiramisu al limone | Indian gulab jamun | Turkish baklava | Mauritian napolitains | Japanese mochi
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

As well as sharing these gorgeous confections, the communities have been working incredibly hard on the exhibition and festival. In further posts we will show you sneak peeks of what will be happening on festival day and in the exhibition, both opening on Sunday 18 March 2012.

Committee members with an array of sweets. Sweets committee members with an array of sweets.
Image: Dylan Kelly
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Links:

Sweets at Immigration Museum

Lunar New Year

Author
by Nicole D
Publish date
10 February 2012
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On Sunday 29 January Melbourne’s Chinatown came alive with beating drums, firecrackers, lion and dragon dances, kung fu demonstrations, market stalls, and great food. We went down for a little look to enjoy the spectacle and join the thousands of people from diverse backgrounds who came to celebrate Lunar New Year.

Dragons ready to parade Dragons ready to parade
Image: Nic Davis
Source: Nic Davis
 

Monday 23 January 2012 marked the official Lunar New Year – often referred to as Chinese New Year. It is the most important celebration of the year for many communities throughout Asia, including in China, Malaysia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia and Thailand. It’s a time for families to reunite and celebrate together, with the festivities often lasting for a whole month from around mid January to mid February.  

Wing Chun demonstration Wing Chun demonstration
Image: Nic Davis
Source: Nic Davis
 

It is a festival rich with symbolism, designed to bring prosperity and happiness in the New Year. Decorations in cities throughout Asia go up early in January and the streets, stores and homes are riot of colour that rivals the Christmas season in Australia, with houses, streets, shops and businesses, brightly festooned with red lanterns, cherry blossoms, paper banners and other decorations.  

Crowds in Chinatown enjoying the Lion Dance Crowds in Chinatown enjoying the Lion Dance
Image: Nic Davis
Source: Nic Davis
 

Contemporary and traditional decorations for New Year Contemporary and traditional decorations for New Year
Image: Nic Davis
Source: Nic Davis
 

Of course Lunar New Year festivities are not limited to Asia, with Chinese communities throughout the world celebrating the festival. Australia’s long history of immigration from Asian countries means that today the Lunar New Year is one of the biggest celebrations in our diverse calendar of cultural events. Events are held in throughout the country, including in Melbourne’s Chinatown, Footscray, Richmond, Springvale, Box Hill and regional centres such as Bendigo.

A traditional Lion Dance team A traditional Lion Dance team
Image: Nic Davis
Source: Nic Davis
 

Links:

MV Blog: Five things about dragons

Piers Festival

Author
by Max
Publish date
3 February 2012
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On the afternoon of Saturday 28 January, I made my way down to Port Melbourne for the Piers Festival, a celebration of migration at Station and Princes Piers. The Immigration Museum had a display at Station Pier about – you guessed it – Station Pier!

Immigration Museum’s ‘Station Pier’ exhibition Immigration Museum’s ‘Station Pier’ exhibition at Station Pier.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Even though the festival was to celebrate both piers, it was really about launching the newly opened Princes Pier after its recent $34 million renovation. The poor dear had ended up in a terrible state after years of neglect. The renovation included restoration of the gatehouse, plus installation of a rotunda with touch screens showing the history of the pier, large raised deck platforms, an area of artificial turf, a generous amount of seating, and public binoculars for viewing ships at sea. Last but not least, the first 196 metres of decking were replaced with a concrete slab, for which the entire gatehouse had to be lifted in order for it to be poured – no mean feat.

Princes Pier Children playing at Princes Pier
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

In the gatehouse was an exhibition of historical photographs from Princes Pier – soldiers off to war, local boys on bikes, and migrants arriving after the war.

Ottoman Mehter Marching Band. Ottoman Mehter Marching Band.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The festival was put on by Multicultural Arts Victoria and the program included a wide variety of performers and musicians, starting with the Victorian Police Pipe Band and finishing with the Melbourne Ska Orchestra. The most arresting costumes were of the Ottoman Mehter Marching Band. Poor guys, it was about 35 degrees in the shade, never mind under their hats!

Enterprize crew The crew of the Enterprize showing off their Jigging and Reeling skills.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Ska Orchestra Ska Orchestra
Image: Max Strating
Source: Melbourne Museum
 

Mexican heads One of the many stalls selling tasty treats and colourful crafts.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 
 
The evening ended with a generous fireworks display. Can’t wait for next year’s festival!

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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