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DISPLAYING POSTS TAGGED: immigration (2)

Scots Wha Hae

Author
by Sadie
Publish date
7 November 2014
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Comments (1)

Sadie works on exhibitions at Museum Victoria.

Question: What do the following Victorian place names have in common:

Armadale, Arthurs Seat, Bairnsdale, Ben Cruachan, Boisdale, Campbellfield, Clunes, Clydesdale, Coldstream, Drysdale, Ensay, Glenaladale, Glenelg River, Hepburn Springs, The Grampians, Lauriston, Lismore, Loch Sport, Mt Stewart, Orbost, Queensferry, Rutherglen, St Andrews, Stonehaven?

Scenery of mountains Lake Wartook, Grampians National Park
Image: Ken Harris
Source: Ken Harris
 

Answer: All these place names come from a place in Scotland or from a Scottish name.

The Scots are one of Australia’s oldest migrant groups. 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of the first formal migration from Scotland to Victoria. During the 19th century many Scottish people settled in Victoria’s Western, Wimmera and Gippsland districts.

Women in Scottish dress Caledonian Society, Bendigo, Victoria, circa 1905
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Scots were represented among professions that bestowed place names—including governors and surveyors—hence many Victorian towns have Scottish names today. Thus, Campbellfield and Mt Stewart reference significant Scottish clans while Arthurs Seat and the Grampians hark back to fondly remembered locations in Scotland.

Girl in Scottish dress outside school building Garvoc, Victoria, circa 1935
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Our latest community exhibition, Scots Wha Hae, reveals the influence of the Scottish in Victoria from the 19th century to the continuing influx of young Scots today. You'll encounter stories of Dame Nellie Melba, Macpherson Robertson, AC/DC and the textile designer who developed the Victorian tartan.

Children in Scottish dress with woman playing bagpipes Highland Dancers, 1950s
Source: Bill Schrank
 

The patriotic song Scots Wha Hae (‘Scots who have’) was written in Scots by Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1793. The unofficial national anthem of Scotland for centuries, it was chosen as the exhibition title by the Scots of Victoria to evoke a sense of Scottish pride while acknowledging the opportunities offered by life in Australia.

One boy and 10 girls in Scottish dress Highland dancers
Image: Kara Lorgelly
Source: Kara Lorgelly

The exhibition Scots Wha Hae: 200 years of Scottish influence opens at the Immigration Museum on 15 November 2014. Come help us celebrate at the Scottish Fling Festival on 16 November with Scottish food, dancing, whisky-tasting and more.

Piers Festival

Author
by Max
Publish date
3 February 2012
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Comments (1)

On the afternoon of Saturday 28 January, I made my way down to Port Melbourne for the Piers Festival, a celebration of migration at Station and Princes Piers. The Immigration Museum had a display at Station Pier about – you guessed it – Station Pier!

Immigration Museum’s ‘Station Pier’ exhibition Immigration Museum’s ‘Station Pier’ exhibition at Station Pier.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Even though the festival was to celebrate both piers, it was really about launching the newly opened Princes Pier after its recent $34 million renovation. The poor dear had ended up in a terrible state after years of neglect. The renovation included restoration of the gatehouse, plus installation of a rotunda with touch screens showing the history of the pier, large raised deck platforms, an area of artificial turf, a generous amount of seating, and public binoculars for viewing ships at sea. Last but not least, the first 196 metres of decking were replaced with a concrete slab, for which the entire gatehouse had to be lifted in order for it to be poured – no mean feat.

Princes Pier Children playing at Princes Pier
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

In the gatehouse was an exhibition of historical photographs from Princes Pier – soldiers off to war, local boys on bikes, and migrants arriving after the war.

Ottoman Mehter Marching Band. Ottoman Mehter Marching Band.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The festival was put on by Multicultural Arts Victoria and the program included a wide variety of performers and musicians, starting with the Victorian Police Pipe Band and finishing with the Melbourne Ska Orchestra. The most arresting costumes were of the Ottoman Mehter Marching Band. Poor guys, it was about 35 degrees in the shade, never mind under their hats!

Enterprize crew The crew of the Enterprize showing off their Jigging and Reeling skills.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Ska Orchestra Ska Orchestra
Image: Max Strating
Source: Melbourne Museum
 

Mexican heads One of the many stalls selling tasty treats and colourful crafts.
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 
 
The evening ended with a generous fireworks display. Can’t wait for next year’s festival!

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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