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DISPLAYING POSTS TAGGED: interactive exhibits (1)

Scienceworks exhibits at RCH

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by Damien Currie
Publish date
13 March 2012
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This guest post is by Damien Currie, Monash University Journalism student and Public Relations Intern with Museum Victoria.

Fifteen Scienceworks displays can be found inside Melbourne's new Royal Children's Hospital, acting as a distraction for sick kids needing medical care.

child playing with exhibit Child playing with Scienceworks exhibit at the Royal Children's Hospital.
Image: Damien Currie
Source: Damien Currie
 

Andrew Lewis, Manager of Exhibitions at Scienceworks, led the team who designed and constructed the displays that are scattered around the hospital.

"The majority of ideas are typical Science Centre exhibits, albeit adapted to suit their intended environment. Not having to adhere to any specific theme broadened the list of possibilities," said Andrew.

Childplaying with Scienceworks exhibit Child playing with Scienceworks exhibit at the Royal Children's Hospital.
Image: Damien Currie
Source: Damien Currie
 

Christine Kilpatrick, CEO of the Royal Children's Hospital, said they were delighted at the opportunity to work with the team at Scienceworks.

"In our new hospital, we have created an environment that reflects the unique nature of a children's hospital. Art, nature and learning are reflected throughout recognising the importance of all these to the healing process. We recognise that despite being in hospital, children are still actively learning and developing," she said.

"The Scienceworks interactive learning displays support this philosophy and invite children to explore, engage and learn in the hospital environment. They are not only a welcome distraction, but challenge children to think and solve problems in a fun and surprising way."

Children playing with Scienceworks exhibit Children playing with Scienceworks exhibit at the Royal Children's Hospital.
Image: Damien Currie
Source: Damien Currie
 

The brief given for the designs of the 15 exhibits was quite specific, as they needed to be educational as well as entertaining while being durable and accessible to a wide window of ages.

"The biggest constraints were the tight budget and selecting concepts that provided repeat and ongoing appeal for children who may be required to attend the hospital for extended periods," said Andrew.

Where possible, the displays are wheelchair friendly and able to be used simultaneously by two or more kids. They also needed to not be mechanical or powered by electricity or batteries and be able to be moved with ease so they can be rotated around the hospital to remain fresh and exciting to patients.

The original idea for the project was secured in late 2006 when Scienceworks agreed to participate as a Community Partner to the new hospital project, along with other institutions such as the Melbourne Zoo and the Melbourne Aquarium.

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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