MV Blog

DISPLAYING POSTS FROM: Apr 2011 (17)

Access All Areas awarded

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
11 April 2011
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Comments (3)

Wonderful news – MV's Access All Areas Podcast Adventures just picked up the award for Best Audio/Visual/Podcast category in the MW2011 Best of the Web awards!

Dr Andi Horvath created this podcast series in 2008. Since then, she's taken listeners through parts of the museum most people don't get to see, including research laboratories, exhibition openings, collection stores and more. The audio format is perfect for interviews, poems, noisy collection objects, noiser wildlife, and even the odd scandal from the depths of the museum's past.

Access All Areas screenshot A screenshot of the Access All Areas site.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Big congratulations also to ACMI for winning not only the Education category, but the highly-coveted overall Best of the Web prize, for their excellent video studio site, ACMI Generator.

The Best of the Web awards are presented in conjunction with the annual Museums and the Web conference, which this year ran from 6-9 April in Philadelphia, USA. Judged by a panel of museum professionals, these prestigious awards attract international nominees of a very high standard.

Links:

Access All Areas Podcast Adventures

Access All Areas on iTunes

List of MW2011 Best of the Web winners

Museums and the Web 2011

New shrimp in Port Phillip Bay

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
8 April 2011
Comments
Comments (1)

MV marine biologist Dr Jo Taylor has reported a tropical stowaway in the warm waters around the Newport Power Station - the Sand Shrimp, Crangon uritai.

Sand Shrimp Sand Shrimp Crangon uritai blends in perfectly with the sandy habitats in which it lives.
Image: John Eichler
Source: Museum Victoria
 

This little crustacean with its cunning camouflage is common in East Asian coastal regions and is not native to Australia. Although other species belonging to the same family (Crangonidae) are common in Australian waters, including Port Phillip Bay, this is the first occurrence of this species anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere.

Reported this week in the online scientific journal, Marine Biodiversity Records, Jo and her co-author Dr Tomoyuki Komai suspect the shrimp was accidentally introduced to Port Phillip Bay. This new sand shrimp probably hitch-hiked in ship ballast while in its tiny larval form. It's only the second confirmed introduction of a shrimp to Australia.

Dorsal and lateral view of the Sand Shrimp. Dorsal and lateral view of the Sand Shrimp.
Image: David Staples
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Three specimens were found in 2008 by members of the Marine Research Group and were identified after comparisons with specimens at the Natural History Museum and Institute in Chiba, Japan. Jo has alerted local biologists and ecologists to keep an eye out for the newcomer so we can track its movement, if any, in local waters.

Links:

Article in Marine Biodiversity Records (abstract only)

Infosheet: Introduced marine organisms in Port Phillip Bay

Sand Shrimp on PaDIL

First in line

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
8 April 2011
Comments
Comments (2)

Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs opens to the public this morning, and to ensure she was the first person into the exhibition, a very excited visitor has been waiting at Melbourne Museum since 7:40am.

  Pam Pam and Brian at the front of Melbourne Museum.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Pam and her husband Brian have travelled all the way from Albury to be here for the first session. Pam is clearly a big King Tut fan; she's even wearing him around her neck!

Tickets for the exhibition are selling fast and many sessions are sold out. Be sure to pre-purchase your tickets online.

Bush Blitz video

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
7 April 2011
Comments
Comments (1)

In this video, Head of Sciences Mark Norman and Gunditjmara Elder Ken Saunders talk about the recent Bush Blitz project at Lake Condah.

Watch this video with a transcript

More Bush Blitz video is coming soon!

Bush Blitz is a three-year national project to document plants and animals protected in Australia’s National Reserve System. Bush Blitz is a multi-million dollar partnership between the Australian Government, BHP Billiton, Earthwatch Australia and the Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Network (TERN) AusPlots. It involves Australia’s top scientists from museums, herbariums and research institutions across the country.

Links:

Bush Blitz

Lake Condah Sustainable Development Project

ABC Mission Voices: Lake Condah

Lost and Found

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
5 April 2011
Comments
Comments (3)

The story of Leadbeater's Possum is so interwoven with the history of Museum Victoria that there was no better place to celebrate it than at Melbourne Museum last Sunday.

This tiny, highlands marsupial was first described by the museum's director, Sir Frederick McCoy in 1867, who named it Gymnobelideus leadbeateri after our first taxidermist, John Leadbeater.

By the 1900s, it was thought extinct. No one saw it for decades. Charles Brazenor, later to become director of the museum, published a plea in 1946 for naturalists to find the creature to no avail. In 1961, a young museum employee changed the fate of Leadbeater's Possum. The amazing story of its rediscovery is recorded in this short film by Curator of History of Science, Rebecca Carland:


On Sunday 3 April, exactly 50 years after his first glimpse of a wild Leadbeater's Possum, Eric was honoured at a ceremony jointly organised by Parks Victoria, Friends of the Leadbeater’s Possum and Museum Victoria. On behalf of the museum and the people of Victoria, Robin Hirst presented Eric with a print of Leadbeater's Possum from the Prodromus of Zoology.

Attendees at Leadbeater's event L-R: Robin Hirst, Director of Collections, Research and Exhibitions; Eric Wilkinson; CEO Patrick Greene and curator Rebecca Carland.
Image: Liza Dale-Hallet
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Eric handed a young sapling of Mountain Ash as a symbolic baton of care to a representative of the of the group HELP (Help the Endangered Leadbeater's Possum). Four Year 7 students started HELP in 2009 to raise awareness of the plight of the species and to gather funds to assist in its future survival. Eric spoke about the inspiring work they've done so far, and the important role of the next generation in protecting our state's faunal emblem.

Students Jo Antrobus from Parks Victoria with students from St. Margarets School, Berwick, special guest speaker and environment ambassador Sheree Marris and Lake Mountain mascot Lenny Leadbeater. Lake Mountain is home to most of the remaining Leadbeater's Possum habitat.
Image: Liza Dale-Hallett
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Links:

The Age article: Hello, possums! Breed saved from extinction 50 years on

Leadbeater's Possum on Collections Online

Friends of Leadbeater’s Possum

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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