Discovering Mexican Food

Author
by Adrienne
Publish date
1 August 2014
Comments
Comments (0)

Adrienne creates and presents public programs at Melbourne Museum.

White bean soup, crunchy crickets, sweet amaranth tamales. Sound familiar? If you've visited Mexico, perhaps, but for many of the guests at the museum's June master classes, the food of the Aztecs was surprising and new.

Crunchy crickets dish Crunchy crickets dish
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Mexican food and particularly its Aztec roots were presented by those in the know: three VIP food experts who flew into Melbourne from Mexico for a unique opportunity to highlight the Aztecs exhibition on display at Melbourne Museum.

Two visiting Mexican chefs Two of the VIP Mexican chefs. Left: Yuri de Gortari, Head Chef. Right: Leon Aguirre, Sous-chef and translator
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The three VIPs established the School of Gastronomy, History, Art and Culture in Mexico and for more than a decade have researched and presented Mexican food history. Yuri de Gortari is the Head Chef of the school and is a well known Mexican television celebrity, presenting traditional Mexican recipes on morning TV. Sous-chef and translator Leon Aguirre has just recorded his first television series focusing on more modern Mexican food. And behind the scenes, Edmundo Escamilla has been undertaking research on Mexican food history for the past two decades, amassing thousands of historic recipes.

Agriculture was practised in Mexico as early as 7,000 BC. Early cultivation, of corn and chillies, expanded over the millennia to include tomatoes, amaranth, chia, vanilla, avocado, papaya and guava. By the time the Spanish arrived in the early 16th century, the Emperor's table proffered 'a large feast... with a type of gold cup serving cocoa drinks scented with vanilla; a large variety of rabbits and hares, as well as wild boar, venison, partridges, pheasants, ducks and turkey, all of them prepared in a variety of different sauces, and a wide variety of fruits from all over the Empire.*' 

Guests at the master classes didn't quite get Moctezuma's feast but were treated to a menu which started and finished with tamales, one savoury, one sweet. Tamales are corn husks stuffed with goodies such as beans or amaranth, a small seed that looks like sesame. Edmundo has collected more than 5,000 recipes for tamales.

Man in kitchen Food Historian Edmundo Escamilla preparing tamales for guests at the masterclass.
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The savoury black bean tamales were followed by the fried grasshopper dish, reportedly tasting like anchovies. Then came a delicious white bean soup with strips of pickled cactus, followed by fish in an Acuyo sauce made from the Piper auritum plant indigenous to tropical Mesoamerica. This plant is used to make green sauce (mole verde), and to flavour meats, tamale mixes, eggs, soups, chocolate drinks, goats' cheese and a liquor called Verdin.

Two Mexican dishes Delicious Mexican food. Left: tamales - steamed beans wrapped in corn husks. Right: Fish in Acuyo Sauce.
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The last savoury dish was rabbit with guajillo chillies. Apparently there are at least nine indigenous species of rabbit in Mexico and two types of hare. Along with fish, turkey, dog, duck, possum, peccary and armadillo, rabbit was common Aztec fare, and continues to be popular in Mexico today. The chefs used a wide range of chillies in their dishes from fat chocolatey-looking ones to fine red hot slim chillies, but said that chillies were meant to be used for their deep flavouring of dishes not for their heat.

Two Mexican dishes More tasty dishes the Aztecs would know. Left: White bean soup with strips of pickled cactus. Right: Rabbit slow-cooked in chilli and tomato.
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Sweets and sweet drinks are common in Mexico and the guests were treated to cacao flavoured water and a selection of amaranth candy and peanut candy to round off the day. The cacao beans were handed around for taste, and the bitterness was distinct. Apparently it was only in Victorian times that sugar was added to cacao to make what we know as the flavour of chocolate today.

Mexican cooking master class Maste rclass goodies. Left: a display of types of grain. Right: showbags!
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

With a bag of goodies donated by Mexican businesses around Melbourne including sweets, tortillas, sauces and candies, guests left knowing more of the cuisine that has influenced the world since the Spanish conquest and a greater understanding the wholesome, balanced and nutritious gastronomy of the Aztecs.

The master classes were developed by the Education and Community Programs team at Melbourne Museum as part of the Aztecs exhibition. The Mexican VIPs were brought to Melbourne by the Mexican Embassy of Australia especially for the master classes. Peter Rowland Catering at Melbourne Museum partnered and supported the events in the Treetops Restaurant at Melbourne Museum.

* Source: Notes provided by the School of Gastronomy, History, Art and Culture, Mexico City

Comments (0)

Write your comment below All fields are required

We love receiving comments, but can’t always respond.

About this blog

Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

Categories