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DISPLAYING POSTS BY: Guests (178)

Guests

Guest posts are written by a variety of people from Museum Victoria and beyond.

Desperately Seeking Graham

Author
by Nick Crotty
Publish date
19 January 2015
Comments
Comments (2)

Nick is a Collections Manager at Scienceworks. He likes piña coladas, walks in the rain, Star Wars and hiding away from the light.

This radio recently came off display in The Melbourne Story. I was returning it to storage when I noticed that a conservator had bagged a small piece of paper while cleaning the radio in 2008, and had suggested that it be kept with the object. 

Radio from 1933 Broadcast Receiver (radio) made by Astor. This is the Mickey Mouse, model circa 1933 (ST 028290).
Image: Nick Crotty
Source: Museum Victoria
 

This torn slip of paper was not originally part of the radio, but tightly rolled and inserted inside a small hole on the side.

Side of old radio The side of the radio showing the hole with a piece of paper rolled inside.
Image: Rebecca Dallwitz
Source: Museum Victoria
 

On one side of the paper was typed 'TAKE A PAIR OF SPARKLING EYE...' (the paper was torn here), and on the other, was beautifully handwritten in pen 'I put on the paper “Do you like Graham” and she said “Of course I do”!!!'

Detail of hand-written note The two sides of the note found inside the radio.
Image: Nick Crotty
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Well, this is interesting! Immediately I started wondering; who wrote the note? And why did they place it inside the radio? Were they trying to hide it, or save it for reading later? Or were they just using it to stop excess noise coming out of the radio (or bugs getting in?!). 

Who is the 'she'? Who was 'Graham'? His name was written with the H underlined three times. Was there another Graeme without an H? What made Graham special? Did it refer to Graham Kennedy? He was on the radio in the early 1950s and on In Melbourne Tonight from 1957 to 1970.

Graham Kennedy A signed photo of Melbourne television personality Graham Kennedy in 1957, sitting on the set of his live variety program In Melbourne Tonight which was filmed at the studios of GTV Channel 9 in Richmond, Victoria.
Image: Athol Shmith
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Was there meaning behind the typed piece of paper? A quick google search of the words brought up a Gilbert & Sullivan song called Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes from the operetta The Gondoliers. It’s a song sung in Act 2 by Marco Palmieri, a Venetian Gondolier, and is described by one critic as 'the most saccharine and chauvinistic ditty' of the Gilbert & Sullivan canon.

Two men in costume Rutland Barrington and Courtice Pounds as Marco and Giuseppe from the 1889 original production of The Gondoliers.
Source: The Gilbert and Sullivan Archive
 

Then I thought, was this a note passed in class? I wonder if school kids still do, or do they just text each other now? Of course this note was about another note ('I put on the paper'). Is this an old fashioned version of forwarding? Has anyone done anthropological research into the act of childhood note-passing during class?

I thought perhaps the source of this object might provide some clues. It was bought for the collection on 25 February 1972 from the Salvation Army Op Shop in Abbotsford, presumably by a curator. Our collection database says that during early January and February 1972, eight electronic valves were also purchased from the same shop.

Normally the museum acquires objects with a good provenance or story as that helps form exhibitions and captures the imagination of visitors. Sometimes, particularly in the Technology collections, we collect objects because of the part they played in technological development, especially if they are in good condition. The famous Astor Mickey Mouse was the biggest-selling radio in Australia during the 1930s.

Unfortunately I have reached a dead end. It might just be one of those mysteries that will never be solved. Nevertheless, the story of what could have happened has piqued my interest for a few days.

If you or a family member donated an old radio to the Abbotsford Salvation Army Op Shop in the early 1970s and knew a friend that had a liaison with someone called Graham (with an H) please leave a comment. I’d love to hear the full tale, especially if there is a happily ever after.

North South Feast West backyard blitz

Author
by Catherine Devery
Publish date
15 January 2015
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Catherine makes her living administrating and programming festivals at the Immigration Museum. She is yet to win the Museum Victoria annual end of year party costume competition but she never says never.

The Immigration Museum is getting a backyard blitz. For our upcoming North South Feast West series, we’re activating our iconic CBD courtyard and creating the perfect setting to feast on culture.

The key to the courtyard transformation is an outdoor built environment by architects Millie Cattlin and Joseph Norster. Millie and Joe form These are THE PROJECTS we do together, a design practice known for creative and thoughtful installations that occupy public space.

Courtyard with seating made from pallets Testing Grounds outdoor art space by “The Projects”.
Source: creativespaces.net.au
 

The installation is taking place this week in time for Sunday’s Chocolate Fest. The courtyard will be converted into a Chocolate Beer Garden featuring Choc Hops from Mildura Brewery and specialised Mörk Chocolate/Rooftop Honey “Mörktails”. The festival will feature chocolate stalls and tastings, talks and workshops and entertainment from a selection of Melbourne DJs and outfits.

Bowls of chocolate things Delicious chocolately treats from Mörk.
Source: Mörk Chocolate
 

Every Friday night in February, the courtyard will become an inner city cantina. Presented in association with PBS FM, each Courtyard Cantina will feature a bar and food pop-up from a variety of vendors including the likes of Senor BBQ, Boss Man Food, Trailer Made, Shebeen and Kumo. Music will be provided by a line-up of DJs and the entire museum will be open after hours for the duration of the events.

Courtyard Cantina flyer Courtyard Cantina flyer
Source: Museum Victoria
 

In April, we’ll fire up the courtyard BBQ for Chilli Fest and Coffee Fest in June will explore the world’s take on the humble café.

The whole series of events compliment the permanent exhibitions at the Immigration Museum which explore the history and impact of immigration in Victoria as well as stories of real people and contemporary Melbourne culture. It’s also a great opportunity to see Freedom: Photographs by Andy Drewit, a photography exhibition that celebrates refugees and asylum seekers’ freedom to pursue interests and engage in hobbies once safe in Australia. Freedom is showing until 31 May.

For tickets and more information, please visit the North South Feast West page. You can also follow all the happenings on Facebook: facebook.com/NorthSouthFeastWest. 

#NSFeastW 

Dinorama ready for summer

Author
by Adrienne Leith
Publish date
12 December 2014
Comments
Comments (0)

Museum Victoria’s Senior Palaeontologist, Dr Tom Rich, says ‘most people don’t realise that Victoria looked completely different 120 million years ago. If you wanted to you could walk all the way to Antarctica. The vegetation was lush and green. During the winter, it was dark all day. This was the world of the polar dinosaurs that once roamed Victoria.’

It's a world that we're recreating in miniature through our Dinorama – a diorama of the rift valley in southeastern Australia during the Cretaceous period. Our preparators drew from the work of the museum’s palaeontologists and key artists, such as Dr Rich and Peter Trusler, to model the ancient landscape from styrofoam.

Two men in workshop Preparators Kim Haines and Brendon Taylor survey and discuss their progress on the Dinorama.
Image: Adrienne Leith
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Man building a diorama in a workshop Kim Haines sanding the waterways of the diorama.
Image: Adrienne Leith
Source: Museum Victoria

Man painting diorama in workshop Brendon Taylor putting the final touches on the diorama.
Image: Adrienne Leith
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The preps sanded and painted the diorama to create the detailed waterways of the valley. Preparator Brendon Taylor also painted a backboard to show the sky and give the diorama depth.

Apart from adding the last touches of some vegetation, the diorama is now ready for the foyer in anticipation of our summer holiday program. Come to Melbourne Museum in the summer holidays to help populate the Dinorama with miniature animals from the period. 

The Dinorama activity will run daily from 11am to 3pm from 26 December to 27 January.

Links:

MV Blog: Dinosaur diorama

School Holiday activities at Melbourne Museum

Farewell Stella

Author
by Priscilla Gaff
Publish date
9 December 2014
Comments
Comments (12)

Priscilla is a Program Coordinator for Life Sciences and works on education programs at Melbourne Museum.

Stella Young and I both started working at the museum in the same week, back in 2007. I’d come from a small team of five to the large beast that is ‘the museum’, and I was thrilled to make a new best buddy in week one.

Stella Young Stella in the museum office, showcasing her stylish new glasses, 2009.
Image: Murphy Peoples
Source: Murphy Peoples
 

We instantly knew we were one anothers' people. We bonded over our excitement to be working at the museum, and over our love of working with the children, families, and schools who visited. We’d both studied education at uni, and loved debriefing and deconstructing our interactions with the students – and in particular about the funny things the children would say. But my story of friendship with Stella isn’t unique; it wasn’t long before everyone in the museum knew her too. Her charm, her wit, her style, her intelligence and her warmth, not to mention her ‘naughty knits’ for sale at the Christmas Staff Market, drew us all into her. And we all loved working with her.

Stella Young at craft stall Stella Young with her naughty knits hidden behind the red curtain, museum staff Christmas craft market, 2009.
Image: Murphy Peoples
Source: Murphy Peoples
 

Stella – you were a dear friend to us all. You challenged us, changed us, you left the museum a better place. We missed you when you left us for the ABC, but you stayed in touch, and we knew that your new job gave you an amazing platform for your passion and talents.

Three performers Museum Comedy tour guides Ben MacKenzie, Kate McLennnan and Stella Young, 2011.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We never stopped thinking of you as one of us, and we shall miss you terribly.

Before joining the ABC, Stella was based at Melbourne Museum where she was a Programs Officer for over three years. During her time at the museum Stella was a fantastic communicator, terrific work colleague, passionate educator and a great friend to many current and former staff members. We send our profound condolences to her family and friends.

Dinosaur diorama

Author
by Adrienne Leith
Publish date
18 November 2014
Comments
Comments (1)

Adrienne creates and presents public programs at Melbourne Museum.

Imagine a Victorian Cretaceous rift valley complete with river bed, trees and a suite of prehistoric animals. Now imagine it recreated in miniature in a classic museum diorama: the DINORAMA!

Displayed in front of the Forest Gallery, the Dinorama will be the feature activity of our summer school holidays at Melbourne Museum. We're inviting visitors to make thousands of Cretaceous animals to fill the little landscape with life.

model of dinosaur Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei was a horned dinosaur, fossils of which were found at Kilcunda. Kim Haines made this tiny version.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

In consultation with our palaeontologists, our preparators made miniatures of three animals—Koolasuchus cleelandi, Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei and Qantassaurus intrepidus—that lived in Victoria approximately 120 million years ago. From the models, the preparators make moulds…. and from the moulds, summer visitors can create thousands of little beasts from modelling clay.

model of dinosaur Michael Pennell's model of Koolasuchus cleelandi, a three-metre-long predator that lived in and around fast-flowing cold streams. Fossils of Koolasuchus were were found on the coast of Victoria just east of Phillip Island.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Every couple of days we'll bring out a new colour of clay until we have a Dinorama filled with multi-coloured ancient animals. Our school holiday activities start on 26 December, so keep an eye on the Melbourne Museum foyer after then.

modelling a dinosaur Inverloch was the discovery site of Qantassurus intrepidus, a small herbivorous hypsilophodontid with large eyes for foraging in long polar winters. Brendon Taylor created this model. You can see an animatronic Qantassaurus in the 600 Million Years exhibition.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Victorian Collections hits 50,000 objects

Author
by Cameron
Publish date
13 November 2014
Comments
Comments (0)

Cameron is Project Co-Manager of Victorian Collections. He's often found in regional RSLs discussing collection management over tea and scones. 

Victorian Collections, a gateway to the cultural treasures held by Victoria’s museums, galleries and other collections, has just broken the 50,000 object mark. We reached this milestone when the Tatura Irrigation and Wartime Camps Museum moved their catalogue of over 3,000 records across to Victorian Collections.

The Tatura collection is a fascinating part of Victoria’s history. Many of the objects were made by German, Italian and Japanese prisoners of war or civilians interned during the 1940s, many of whom settled in Victoria after the war. Having the collection online gives Victorians unprecedented access to their lives through photos, letters and many other objects. You can also view them on Trove.

The fascinating objects from Tatura include this Christmas tree, given by the Red Cross to internees of the camps during the Second World War.

Small Christmas tree on table Artificial Christmas tree on wooden stand decorated with bells, stars and candles.
Source:  Tatura Irrigation & Wartime Camps Museum
 

Community collecting organisations from across the State have been using Victorian Collections to catalogue and publish the records of collections to the web since it was developed by Museums Australia (Vic) and Museum Victoria in 2009. This year has seen close to a doubling of the number of objects on the site.  

Many of the Tatura internees were German POWs capture in North Africa. This photograph is from Kurt Straszewski’s POW album, and shows soldiers arriving in Australia before being shipped to Tatura.

Two men in military uniform A photograph from the album of the Kurt Straszewski Collection, titled '1941 Ankunft in Australien' (1941 arrival in Australia)
Source: Tatura Irrigation and Wartime Camps Museum
 

Some of Tatura’s internees came from the British Mandate in Palestine. The Weid family, of German descent, were sent from Palestine to Tatura when the war started. Like most internees they brought few possessions with them. This butterfly brooch is just one of the handmade domestic items fashioned in the camp from scrap materials to give home comforts in the initially barren surroundings of the camps, particularly to those interned with families and young children. 
 
The camps were used after the war to house British child migrants brought out to Australia by the Presbyterian Church. This photo shows a 2001 reunion of the boys at the Dhurringile Training Farm at Dhurringile Mansion in Tatura. 

Group of elderly men Reunion in 2001 of boys brought out to Australia from the U.K. in the 1950s by the Presbyterian Church, to the Dhurringile Training Farm at Dhurringile Mansion.
Source: Tatura Irrigation & Wartime Camps Museum
 

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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