Guests

DISPLAYING POSTS BY: Guests (145)

Guests

Guest posts are written by a variety of people from Museum Victoria and beyond.

All hands on deck with LEGO®

Author
by Bronwyn
Publish date
20 January 2014
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Bronwyn is the manager of MV's Discovery Centres.

Melbourne Museum’s LEGO® Mystery Mosaic summer holiday activity is proving very popular with visitors, and they are assembling mosaic squares faster than we ever anticipated. Our Manager of Education and Community Programs, Georgie Meyer,  put out a call to all museum staff to help prepare the next mosaic board for our enthusiastic visitors.

visitors with lego Melbourne Museum visitors constructing pieces of the mosaic.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Girl holding lego The mosaic is made from 4,600 of these mosaic squares, each covered in coloured tiny LEGO® blocks.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

woman with lego mosaic Susie placing a completed piece onto the mosaic board.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

To keep this activity running, two giant 4m x 2m mosaic boards are rotated; as one board is completed a new one is rolled out. Preparing the new board involves a mammoth effort to unpick 170,000 tiny LEGO® blocks from 4,600 mosaic squares. Georgie and the public programs crew thought we would have a ten day turnaround to do this, however it is taking only five days for our eager visitors to fill a board!

LEGO® Mystery Mosaic James Bond starting to emerge from the mosaic.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Staff from all over the museum – including managers, web programmers, preparators, designers, technicians, volunteers, customer service officers, educators, information services folk, even the CEO – have spent an hour or two at the makeshift drop-in centre to disassemble the mosaic. While taking it apart is perhaps not as much fun as putting it together, it's enjoyable knowing we are contributing to a wonderful visitor experience. 

people unpacking lego Behind the scenes, museum staff and volunteers disassembling the mosaic ready for visitors to construct it again.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

 

The LEGO® Mystery Mosaic runs until 26 January 2014.

Alpine School interviews at Alps Bioscan

Author
by Priscilla
Publish date
7 January 2014
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Comments (2)

Priscilla is a Program Coordinator for Life Sciences and works on education programs at Melbourne Museum.

In 1914 and 1915, scientists and field naturalists explored the Alpine region of Victoria. Nearly one hundred years later, we sent our museum's ornithologists, herpetologists, mammalogists, entomologists, palaeontologists, and others out into the field to explore, discover, and record the wildlife – alive and fossilised. This recent expedition in November last year, called the Alpine Bioscan, was a collaboration between Museum Victoria and Parks Victoria to perform a major wildlife census in the eastern region of Victoria’s Alpine National Park, with 100 experts taking part.

black and white photo of men on horses Men and horses during the survey of the Alpine area in 1914 and 1915.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

People with malasie trap Today’s scientists: Mel Mackenzie, MV’s Marine Invertebrate Collection Manager, and Parks Victoria staff inspecting a Malaise trap in the Alps. Malaise traps catch flying insects.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We’ll never know exactly the thoughts and experiences of those early researchers in the black and white photographs – but to ensure that doesn’t happen again, we invited eight students from the Alpine School to become Bioscan Ambassadors. Their role was to interview our scientists, record it and share it. The response from the students was overwhelming; all 45 students in the school wanted to participate. The lucky eight had their names pulled from a hat.

So, on the afternoon of November 28th, I went with MV historian Rebecca Carland to the Alpine School to work with the students and their teacher Nicola. The students learned from Bec how to interview a scientist, what makes a good question, and how to plan and record an oral history to make an interview clip. When they learned that their clips may become a permanent part of the museum’s collection, two students nearly cried with happiness.

eight students at table The eight Bioscan Ambassadors, workshopping their ideas for interviewing the scientists.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

On day two of the project, the students and the scientists met at Omeo Memorial Hall. The students' training put them in good stead for the realities of filming in the field – dealing with difficulties like not being able to film outside due to the rain, bad acoustics, and even unflattering lighting. But, like pros – they pushed on, filming and questioning scientists through the challenges.

Four people around a computer Students editing their clip with assistance from Bec Carland, MV historian and Roger Fenwick, Manager Regional Operations, Parks Victoria.
Image: Heath Warwick
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The result was four great video interviews of Museum Victoria scientists which are now on the Making History channel on Vimeo. In another century, when people look back at the photographs of today’s scientists in the field and wonder who these people were, the students’ films will show them.

This project was supported by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development’s Strategic Partnership Program.

Links:

Interview with Mel Mackenzie

Interview with Mark Norman

Interview with Rolf Schmidt

Interview with Ken Walker

Where the locals know best

Author
by Paing Soe
Publish date
26 November 2013
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Paing Soe is a Master of Environment student at the University of Melbourne.

This is the third post of an MV Blog mini-series celebrating the past, present and future of exploration on planet Earth and commemorating the adventures of Alfred Russel Wallace who died 100 years ago.

Dr. Kevin Rowe and Dr. Karen Rowe give their unreserved credit to the local people—the guides, the village heads and the Indonesian scientists—for the discoveries that they've made together in Sulawesi. But it took a bit of work to get them on side, according to Kevin. "They were not convinced that you can make a living doing what we do. So they were suspicious that we probably had a hidden agenda," he says.

Sulawesi field team A photo opportunity with the local team in Mamasa, West Sulawesi Province, May 2012.
Image: Kevin Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria
 

"On these mountains, only the local people really know what's there," says Kevin. The locals in Mamasa, a mountain town on the island of Sulawesi, had a name for almost every species, including animals that have not been described by science. Such knowledge was essential in the scientific discovery of an almost toothless rodent, Paucidentomys vermidax.

Man holding rodent Gherzhon, a local guide from Mamasa, West Sulawesi Province, holding the recently described Paucidentomys vermidax he helped collect.
Image: Kevin Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria
 

On the last day of a trip in 2012, local guides caught a rare rat that in local tradition is believed to safeguard homes from fire. While some of the guides wanted to keep the rat for this reason, one guide argued how important it could be to the expedition and made sure it was shared with the scientists. The specimen turned out to be the only record of the species at the site. "That kind of support depends on building trust and relationships with local people," says Kevin.

"It's just impossible really, to go in there without a local partner," agrees Karen. Local scientists understand the cultural context, the bureaucracy, and are much more effective with exploration and conservation when it comes to biodiversity on these islands. Working with Anang Achmadi, Curator of Mammals, and Tri Haryoko, Curator of Birds, at the national museum of Indonesia, Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense, their research programs have led to a strong collaboration between Museum Victoria and MZB.

The more that local scientists can work independently, the better. Kevin and Karen Rowe take this approach despite the fact that their own expeditions are going so well. "The future of biodiversity research in Indonesia lies with local scientists. Our hope is that we can promote their training and success," says Kevin.

Anang Achmadi, curator of mammals Anang Achmadi, Curator of Mammals at Museum Zoologicum Bogorinese in camp on Mount Gandangdeata near Mamasa, West Sulawesi Province, Sulawesi.
Image: Kevin Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Check out the other posts in this mini-series: The Age of Exploration continues and Exploration of Sulawesi, Indonesia

Indigenous Pathways placement

Author
by Mitch Mahoney
Publish date
18 November 2013
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MV's Indigenous Pathways program provides Indigenous students with the opportunity to experience life behind the scenes at Melbourne Museum. Recently Mitch Mahoney, a year 10 student from Linuwel School in East Maitland, NSW, spent a week at the museum as part of the program. Mitch impressed everyone with his enthusiasm, inquisitive nature and eagerness to learn. Most of all he impressed us with his possum skin cloak.

My name is Mitch Mahoney. I am Barkindji on my father’s side and Boonwurrung and Yorta Yorta on my mother’s.

My week at Melbourne Museum was amazing. It was fantastic to learn about all the different jobs in the museum and how the different departments of work join together to run such a wonderful place. I was shown around various areas, but my favourites were the Indigenous collections. John Duggan showed me traditional tools, weapons, shields and stone tips. Kimberley Moulton gave me a tour of the First Peoples exhibition pointing out many things that I found interesting, and explaining the huge amount of work that has gone into this exhibition. It tells an amazing story of Aboriginal people. During my time at the museum I was also given the opportunity to show my possum skin cloak that I made for my year ten major work.

Detail of possum skin cloak Detail of the painted and burnt designs of Mitch's possum skin cloak
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria/Mitch Mahoney

I am passionate about my art, the art of my people – Boonwurrung, Yorta Yorta and Barkindji people. As a young child I would always draw Aboriginal style animals and landscapes, but as I grew up I stopped. It was rare that I would draw in Aboriginal style until year ten when I had to decide what to make for my end of year major works. I decided to make a traditional possum skin cloak that would tell a story of my life and my family.  

The cloak is made of 35 possum skins stitched together with a waxy string and on the pelt side I burnt on patterns and drawings of animals.

People looking at possum skin cloak Mitch explaining the symbols on his cloak to his family, including artist Maree Clark, and museum staff.
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria

One of the pieces on my cloak is a sun. The sun is, in my eyes, the greatest power that sustains life. It’s a symbol of hope for me as every day the sun will rise and every night it will set, but you can always be sure it will rise again. In saying that, I do believe that Aboriginal people have risen and over time they did set, but you can be sure that, like the sun they will and are starting to rise again. We are strong people and now we are being recognised for what we are. In making my cloak I am showing people that I am a strong Aboriginal and I am proud of my heritage. I do believe that all Aboriginal people should be proud and strong and show the world who they are and who their people are.

People looking at possum skin cloak Mitch showing his possum skin cloak to museum staff during his visit.
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria / Mitch Mahoney
 

Hand prints of family members are pressed onto the cloak using ochre and wattle sap mixed to make a paint-like substance. Everyone has something personally significant on the skin.

Detail of possum skin cloak Detail of Mitch's cloak showing the owl, a symbol significant to his mother.
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria / Mitch Mahoney
 

Like my mother's owl. The owl is a warning bird, warning of details overlooked in life. The owl sees all. She knows all and she helps remind you to be aware of your surroundings and the people in your life. She reminds you to pay attention to what you do and think of the consequences of your actions. Like a mother, she helps you; she teaches you to think before you act and to know when you have done wrong and to accept the consequences of your actions.

With the making of my possum skin cloak I realise that I have been missing out on the magic of this creative process. Now that I'm starting to become involved with the art again, I have come up with enough ideas on what I would like to make to last me the next few years. I was hoping to make a living in the arts, be involved with my people and bring Aboriginal art to new places in a new way. There are so many mediums to work with inside the “boundaries” of Aboriginal art.

I think that my possum skin cloak is only the beginning of my journey into making Aboriginal art. I thank my family and the people at Melbourne Museum for helping me to see that and I hope that my life will involve my art in a big way.

Exploration of Sulawesi, Indonesia

Author
by Bonnie & Rashika
Publish date
11 November 2013
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Bonnie Gambhir is a Computer Science student with interests in scientific exploration. Rashika Premchandralal is pursuing a Master’s Degree in Biotechnology. Both are studying at the University of Melbourne.

This is the second post of an MV Blog mini-series celebrating the past, present and future of exploration on planet Earth and commemorating the adventures of Alfred Russel Wallace who died 100 years ago.

Wallace's exploration of the islands of Indonesia contributed to the theory of evolution by natural selection, as well as the field biogeography–the study of the distribution of species over space and time. Wallace famously divided the world’s animals into zoogeographic regions, with his travels through modern day Indonesia providing important clues about the transitions of more Asian-like species to those of Australian origin.

"The island of Sulawesi is a place where many Asian lineages get their easternmost distribution and many Australian lineages get their westernmost distribution, and Sulawesi represents a mixture of the flora and fauna of these two great continents," says Dr Kevin Rowe.

Skull of Babirusa MV specimen R8050: skull of Babirusa, Babyrousa celebensis, an ancient lineage of pigs on Sulawesi. Pigs are not native to the Australian continent and Sulawesi represents their easternmost distribution.
Image: Karen Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria
 

mount of Bear Cuscus MV specimen C27221: mount of Bear Cuscus, Ailurops ursinus. An ancient relative of the Ringtail Possum, the Bear Cuscus is endemic to Sulawesi and represents the westernmost distribution of Australian marsupials that never reached the Asian continent.
Image: Karen Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria
  

Since Wallace’s time, further scientific exploration in Wallacea has contributed immensely to our understanding of the distribution and evolution of species.

Researchers at Museum Victoria are continuing this exploration on the island of Sulawesi; Dr Kevin Rowe and Dr Karen Rowe have made several expeditions in recent years, leading to the description of new mammal species and new knowledge of the evolutionary relationships between Indonesian and Australian birds.

When Wallace visited Sulawesi, he recorded only five species of rodents. Today, we recognise almost fifty. Described in 2012 by Kevin and colleagues, one recently- discovered species from Sulawesi challenges the definition of rodent. The unique rat, Paucidentomys vermidax, (meaning “few-toothed worm-devouring mouse”) is the only rodent, among more than 2,200 species, with pointed upper incisors and no molars.

Dr Kevin Rowe with Paucidentomys vermidax Dr Kevin Rowe with Paucidentomys vermidax, a nearly toothless rodent, on the day of its discovery in the rainforests of Sulawesi.
Image: Kevin Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The honeyeater family Meliphagidae is one of the most diverse groups of Australian birds. Most of the nearly 170 species are found in Australia, New Guinea and adjacent Pacific Islands. A few species are native to Wallacea where the family reaches the westernmost limits of its distribution. Through her fieldwork on Sulawesi, Karen is studying the endemic genus Myza and their relationship to all other honeyeaters.

Lesser Sulawesi Honeyeater Lesser Sulawesi Honeyeater, Myza celebensis, found in the forests of Mount Dako, Sulawesi in 2013.
Image: Karen Rowe
Source: Mustum Victoria
 

Expeditions to Sulawesi by MV researchers and their Indonesian and US colleagues have produced several new records of species that have not been recorded since the 1970s. Many of these species were previously known from a single locality and are listed as 'data deficient' by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Hence the recent exploration of Sulawesi is helping to improve understanding of the habitat requirements and distributions of these little-known species.

Local knowledge and assistance is as much a part of modern exploration as it was in Wallace’s time. Our final post in this series will explore how international cooperation has contributed to the success of Museum Victoria’s research in the region.

Links:

MV Blog posts about Sulawesi field research

The Age of Exploration continues

Author
by Chenae Neilson
Publish date
6 November 2013
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Chenae Neilson is a Master of Science in Human Geography student at the University of Melbourne. This is the first post of an MV Blog mini-series celebrating the past, present and future of exploration on planet Earth and commemorating the adventures of Alfred Russel Wallace who died 100 years ago today.

Over the last 250 years, the taxonomic classification of life on Earth has described approximately 1.2 million species that share the planet with us, Homo sapiens. However, every year, we discover thousands of new species. Often these are organisms that have been concealed from scientific observation within impassable forests or the dark of the ocean abyss. A 2011 estimate suggests there are over eight million species on Earth, which means we have described fewer than 15 per cent of them. This stems, in part, because we have explored only five per cent of the world’s oceans, and scientists have yet to survey many terrestrial environments.

This celebration of exploration marks the centenary of the death of explorer, naturalist, and evolutionary biologist Alfred Russel Wallace who died on 7 November 1913. To commemorate Wallace we return to the region of his most famous exploration.

Alfred Russel Wallace, circa 1895. Alfred Russel Wallace, circa 1895.
Image: London Stereoscopic & Photographic Company
Source: Wikimedia Commons

"Nature has taken every precaution that these, her choicest treasures, may not lose value by being too easily obtained."
Alfred Russel Wallace

 

From 1854 to 1862, Wallace traveled across the Indonesian archipelago from the Sunda shelf in the west through the island of Sulawesi and to the Bird's Head of New Guinea in the east. On this journey he noted a distinct transition from more Asian fauna to more Australian fauna – the line demarking this dramatic transition became known as the 'Wallace's Line'. The broader region between Asia and Australia, including the island of Sulawesi, is termed Wallacea, which hosts an endemic combination of Asian and Australian lineages. Wallace’s exploration of Sulawesi made a significant contribution to the species catalogue in this region and also became the backbone of evidence for his own theory of evolution by natural selection. Wallace’s adventures in Wallacea were later chronicled in his book, The Malay Archipelago, written in 1869.

Map of Sunda and Sahul Map of Wallacea, featuring the island of Sulawesi and the biogeographic lines defining breaks between Asian fauna within Sunda and Australasia.
Image: Maximilian Dörrbecker
Source: Used under CC BY-SA 3.0 from Wikimedia Commons.
 

Despite the countless scientific findings made during the Age of Exploration in the 1800s, exploration still remains important today, particularly in a world where natural environments are under threat.

Wallace's trail of exploration has been retraced many times by contemporary scientists, amateur naturalists, and television personalities. Exploration may mean something different to each. For the scientist, these areas are revealing new species and answering questions about the evolutionary history of the region. To the naturalist, the 'discovery' of animals found nowhere else on earth and the chance to walk in the footsteps of an influential figure may be the very definition of exploration. Regardless of our definition of exploration, areas like Wallacea hold many new possibilities.

Over 100 years later, two research scientists at Museum Victoria, Dr Kevin Rowe and Dr Karen Rowe, have been following in the footsteps of Wallace. Some of their recent findings will be the subject of the next blog in our mini-series.

Woman in rainforest in Indonesia Karen Rowe hiking into a remote field camp on Mount Dako, Sulawesi where scientists from MV, Indonesia and the United States inventoried mammals and birds for the first time in 2013.
Image: Kevin Rowe
Source: Museum Victoria

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