Kate C

DISPLAYING POSTS BY: Kate C (179)

Kate C

Kate is MV's online writer and editor. Her job is to dig up great stuff to put on the museum's website. Kate loves shiny things, cake and creepy crawlies.

Six generations of Satchells

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by Kate C
Publish date
1 April 2015
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John Satchell grew up with a colour photograph of a model steam train hanging on his bedroom wall. Not uncommon for small boys, perhaps, but John's train had a direct link to his ingenious ancestors. His train—a perfect, working scale replica of a shunting engine from 1857—was built by his great grandfather, also John, and painted by his great-great grandfather James Satchell. The model train itself, eventually donated to Museum Victoria in 1990, is now on display in The Melbourne Story.

  Steam Locomotive Model Steam Locomotive Model - Hobsons Bay Railway Pier Shunting Engine, No.5. (ST 038379)
Source: Museum Victoria
 

John's father Tony hung the photo for his son and often told him the story of the train. "Dad's a genealogist, and he's researched both sides of the family. He just loves history," says John. "He's always made me more than aware that this train exists and took me to see it in the museum. I loved steam trains as a kid and still do."

With Tony's 80th birthday approaching at the end of March, John and his wife Danielle searched for a unique and meaningful gift for him. They thought of the 1868 photograph of the elder John and James Satchell with their magnificent model, and how they might replicate it with the youngest Satchell, their toddler James. Until young James was born, John explains, genealogist Tony was anxious that "the Satchell family name was running out."

James & John Satchell, 1868 Photograph from 1868 of the Hobson's Bay Railway Pier shunting engine model with modelmaker John Satchell, and his father James Satchell. (ST 037829).
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The Satchells recruited a friend to photograph John and James next to the train's exhibition showcase, but the tricky lighting and reflections meant no success. Danielle wrote a letter to the museum asking if there was any way we could open the showcase so they could get a perfect shot. It was an irresistible opportunity to link six generations of Satchell men, so last week before the museum opened, exhibition and collection management staff brought out the train. MV photographer Jon Augier captured the historic moment.

Child, man and model train Young James Satchell with father John posing with the model train built in the 1860s by their Satchell ancestors. Note the authentic Victorian-era gravitas.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The senior John and James both worked at Melbourne's first foundry, Langlands, originally established on Flinders lane. John was an apprentice there in the 1860s when he built the model, and his father James was a foreman. The model earned John a medal at the Intercolonial Exhibition of Victoria in 1866, and later, when he sold it, enough money to buy a block of land in Caulfield. The story is recorded in the Satchell family history written by Tony Satchell in 1988.

The surprise birthday gift is sure to delight this family historian. It might continue another family tradition, too. Says John of Tony, "he's brought up a couple of times that he thinks James should have a picture of the steam train in his bedroom. I've been saying 'oh yeah, that's a good idea' but leaving it at that because I don't want Dad to start thinking of getting a picture… it could ruin the surprise!"

Museum Victoria wishes Tony a very happy 80th birthday.

Satchell family The whole family: James Satchell with his mum Danielle and father John.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Filming our underwater backyard

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by Kate C
Publish date
23 October 2014
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What do you know of the Vampire Squid? How about the Dragonfish, the Sea Mouse and the Fangtooth? These bizarre animals live kilometres – yes, kilometres – beneath the ocean’s surface. We’ve brought them up to sea level for you to meet at the exhibition Deep Oceans, which opens this weekend at Scienceworks.

Anglerfish exhibit Deep Oceans Anglerfish exhibit
Image: Australian Museum
Source: Australian Museum
 

This exhibition comes to us from the Australian Museum and we’ve added some local characters to the mix. Parks Victoria tells us that nearly half of Port Phillip is less than eight metres deep, and its greatest depth is only 24 metres. It’s just a puddle compared to the true deep oceans. This means we can see a huge diversity of our marine life just by heading out into the bay with a mask and snorkel.

 

Over the past months, Dr Julian Finn has filmed seals, fish, crabs and others in our local marine parks with a fish-eye lens. This footage will be projected inside the Underwater Backyard virtual aquarium dome, where you can stand right beside the bay’s residents without getting wet.

Deep Oceans is at Scienceworks 25 October 2014 to 12 April 2015.

Invertebrate Keeper Workshop

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by Kate C
Publish date
12 August 2014
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Children are sponges: if kids see and hear that invertebrates are fascinating, wonderful and complex, they are eager to appreciate them. Likewise, the next generation of spider-squashers is created when children are told only that bugs and spiders are disgusting, dangerous or scary. Naturally, when you get a roomful of invertebrate keepers from zoos and fauna parks in a room, they’ll discuss how best to show kids that invertebrates are magnificent.

Invertebrate Keeper Training Workshop Invertebrate Keeper Training Workshop participants ponder the big issues with Maik from Live Exhibits: how do you know if your millipede is male or female?
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

And so it was at the Invertebrate Keeper Training Workshop at Melbourne Museum last week. Presented by the Australasian Society of Zoo Keeping (ASZK) and run by Jessie, Chloe and Patrick from MV Live Exhibits, the workshop covered all kinds of techniques for keeping, breeding and displaying living invertebrates, and their educational value. When I dropped in, they were poised to begin a snail race—a contest of extreme athleticism where snails compete to reach the edge of a circular arena.

Snail race And they're off! Snails racing.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The purpose of the race was to show ways to get kids thinking about the biology of minibeasts. Jessie from Live Exhibits explained that in the time it took for the snails to slide over the finish line, you can discuss why they prefer to crawl over damp surfaces, why they don’t like being blown upon, and other quirks of snail life. Jessie also described an excellent way to overcome insect fear in small children while holding large invertebrates like stick insects. “Ask them, can you see its eyes? Can you see the claws on its feet? And they come closer and closer without realising it.”

The workshop also covered how to house, feed and breed invertebrates; how to collect them legally and ethically, and how to keep populations healthy. Participants also got a tour of the Live Exhibits back of house facilities where the museum’s invertebrate colonies are kept, our Entomology collections, and a trip to Melbourne Zoo to see their Butterfly House. Invertebrate keepers talk about stuff you don’t hear every day, like how to breed whip scorpions (it’s tricky but not impossible), and what type of heating to use create a humid insect room (hydronic is best).

And the winner of the snail race? This tearaway Garden Snail streaked across the line not once, but twice, before most of the others had even left the centre ring. The Phar Lap of the snail world. 

winning snail The winner of the snail race glides over the finish line.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

10 years of World Heritage status

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by Kate C
Publish date
1 July 2014
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Many of us have precious heirlooms that escort our families through the decades, cherished by each generation in turn. Perhaps as a child you loved the treasures in the house of your grandparents and now you are the custodian of these objects, charged with keeping them safe for future descendants.

Few of us experience quite the scale of family collections as Will Twycross, who describes his childhood thus: "I grew up in a weatherboard house that contained European paintings, intricately carved ivory chess pieces, brilliantly coloured ceramics, and long Polynesian arrows that we were told were poison tipped and shouldn't be touched…. The paintings with their strange scenes and exotic colours hung on the walls, breathing the soft mists of Europe into the harsh sunlight of the suburbs."

Photograph of a room The drawing room at Emmarine II, the Twycross family home at 23 Seymour Road, Elsternwick, showing various pieces of the John Twycross collection displayed in the home during the mid-20th century.  

chess pieces Ivory puzzle ball chess pieces from a set carved in China in the late Qing Dynasty, circa 1870-1880. Will Twycross played with these as a child.
Image: Benjamin Healley
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Will Twycross is the great-grandson of Melbourne merchant and art collector John ‘Top Hat’ Twycross. The wonders of Will’s childhood home were originally bought by John and his wife Charlotte ‘Lizzie’ Twycross at the 1880 and 1888 Melbourne International Exhibitions. There they acquired several hundred paintings, pieces of furniture and decorative items for their grand house in Caulfield. Through the years, the Twycross family cared for the collection until 2009, when they donated over 200 objects to Museum Victoria's Royal Exhibition Building Collection. "We decided to return it to the place it had come from," notes Will. "The decision seemed to have a certain symmetry to it."

People at an exhibition Illustration of the 1880 Melbourne International Exhibition bustling with visitors.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Today marks ten years of World Heritage status for our beloved Royal Exhibition Building, and we're celebrating with the release of a book and accompanying website about the extraordinary Twycross Collection. In Visions of Colonial Grandeur, curator Dr Charlotte Smith has researched not just the Twycross legacy and the collection itself, but the impact of two international exhibitions – which were, at the time, the largest events held in Australia.

The Royal Exhibition Building is no longer surrounded by the temporary annexes that housed the grand courts of the Melbourne Exhibition Building, but it remains the only Great Hall of its era to survive in its original setting and the world's oldest continuously-operating exhibition hall. On 1 July 2004, the REB was the first Victorian site and the first Australian building to be inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. It followed the 1980s listings of places of outstanding natural and cultural significance such as Kakadu National Park, the Tasmanian Wilderness and the Great Barrier Reef.

Links:

Visions of Colonial Grandeur website: museumvictoria.com.au/colonial-grandeur

Visions of Colonial Grandeur book

John Twycross Melbourne International Exhibitions Collection on Collections Online

Australian sites inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List

WWI ambulance arrives

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by Kate C
Publish date
25 June 2014
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On Monday evening, perhaps just as you were eating dinner, a crew carefully unloaded an extraordinary object from World War I and placed it in the foyer of Melbourne Museum.

 

This is a British-made Ambulance Wagon MK VI. It dates from 1914-18 and is on loan to us from the Australian War Memorial for our upcoming exhibition WWI: Love & Sorrow

One hundred years ago, these horse-drawn ambulances transported wounded soldiers from the battlefield. Unarmoured and vulnerable, they often travelled by night to avoid becoming targets. The journey between trench and casualty clearing station could take many days over rough tracks—an agonising journey for men with terrible injuries.

WWI: Love & Sorrow marks the centenary of the start of World War I. It opens at Melbourne Museum on 30 August 2014.

Catalogue of cephalopods completed

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by Kate C
Publish date
4 June 2014
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Everyone loves a happy ending. And everyone loves octopuses. The recent completion of the third and final volume in the revised FAO Catalogue of Cephalopods of the World nails it on both fronts. 

Cephalopods of the World Volume 3 Cover of the new FAO Cephalopods of the World Volume 3.
Image: Emanuela D’Antoni
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
 

This is a brilliant – and free – resource designed to assist people working in fisheries to identify the cephalopods that we humans are most aware of, namely the ones we've identified, that we eat, or can cause us harm. Volume 3: Octopods and Vampire Squids was co-authored by MV's Dr Mark Norman and Dr Julian Finn. They are also are two of the four series editors.

'Octopus’ berrima Spot the 'Octopus’ berrima in the sandy substrate! (The inverted commas signify that this species is provisionally placed in the genus Octopus.)
Image: Julian Finn
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Years of work and drawing from cephalopod researchers worldwide sees FAO Catalogue of Cephalopods of the World summarising descriptions of species for practical use by non-specialists. "We've distilled it down to diagnostic characters that will allow people on research or fishing vessels to identify species," says Julian. "It's a review of all the taxonomic work that's out there, for people who don't have immediate access to the literature." The species descriptions focus on traits that are easily measured, which is no mean feat for animals famous for changing their shape and form at will. Says Julian, "everything is based on characters that survive preservation and are consistent across members of a species, such as numbers of suckers, presence or absence of structures, and relative lengths of body components."

Julian and Mark also note that this project would not have been possible without significant financial and moral support from the Australian Biological Resources Study and the Hermon Slade Foundation. This allowed them to do the work on octopus taxonomy that was required for this new edition of the Catalogue. 

Argonauta argo The beautiful female Argonaut, or Argonauta argo.
Image: Julian Finn
Source: Museum Victoria
 

So, if you have an interest in, as Ze Frank calls them, 'the floppy floppy spiders of the sea', head to FAO and download a free copy of FAO Catalogue of Cephalopods of the World Volume 3 (PDF, 25.77Mb). And in case you need a reminder about why you love octopuses, here's a video showing how they can open jars from the inside (while we humans sometimes struggle to open them from the outside).

 

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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