Bunjilaka

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Bunjilaka

Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum is a dynamic living cultural centre with an Indigenous garden, artists' space and exhibition gallery celebrating Victoria’s Koorie people and the relationship between Aboriginal people and the land.

Indigenous Pathways placement

Author
by Mitch Mahoney
Publish date
18 November 2013
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MV's Indigenous Pathways program provides Indigenous students with the opportunity to experience life behind the scenes at Melbourne Museum. Recently Mitch Mahoney, a year 10 student from Linuwel School in East Maitland, NSW, spent a week at the museum as part of the program. Mitch impressed everyone with his enthusiasm, inquisitive nature and eagerness to learn. Most of all he impressed us with his possum skin cloak.

My name is Mitch Mahoney. I am Barkindji on my father’s side and Boonwurrung and Yorta Yorta on my mother’s.

My week at Melbourne Museum was amazing. It was fantastic to learn about all the different jobs in the museum and how the different departments of work join together to run such a wonderful place. I was shown around various areas, but my favourites were the Indigenous collections. John Duggan showed me traditional tools, weapons, shields and stone tips. Kimberley Moulton gave me a tour of the First Peoples exhibition pointing out many things that I found interesting, and explaining the huge amount of work that has gone into this exhibition. It tells an amazing story of Aboriginal people. During my time at the museum I was also given the opportunity to show my possum skin cloak that I made for my year ten major work.

Detail of possum skin cloak Detail of the painted and burnt designs of Mitch's possum skin cloak
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria/Mitch Mahoney

I am passionate about my art, the art of my people – Boonwurrung, Yorta Yorta and Barkindji people. As a young child I would always draw Aboriginal style animals and landscapes, but as I grew up I stopped. It was rare that I would draw in Aboriginal style until year ten when I had to decide what to make for my end of year major works. I decided to make a traditional possum skin cloak that would tell a story of my life and my family.  

The cloak is made of 35 possum skins stitched together with a waxy string and on the pelt side I burnt on patterns and drawings of animals.

People looking at possum skin cloak Mitch explaining the symbols on his cloak to his family, including artist Maree Clark, and museum staff.
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria

One of the pieces on my cloak is a sun. The sun is, in my eyes, the greatest power that sustains life. It’s a symbol of hope for me as every day the sun will rise and every night it will set, but you can always be sure it will rise again. In saying that, I do believe that Aboriginal people have risen and over time they did set, but you can be sure that, like the sun they will and are starting to rise again. We are strong people and now we are being recognised for what we are. In making my cloak I am showing people that I am a strong Aboriginal and I am proud of my heritage. I do believe that all Aboriginal people should be proud and strong and show the world who they are and who their people are.

People looking at possum skin cloak Mitch showing his possum skin cloak to museum staff during his visit.
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria / Mitch Mahoney
 

Hand prints of family members are pressed onto the cloak using ochre and wattle sap mixed to make a paint-like substance. Everyone has something personally significant on the skin.

Detail of possum skin cloak Detail of Mitch's cloak showing the owl, a symbol significant to his mother.
Image: Tiffany Garvie
Source: Museum Victoria / Mitch Mahoney
 

Like my mother's owl. The owl is a warning bird, warning of details overlooked in life. The owl sees all. She knows all and she helps remind you to be aware of your surroundings and the people in your life. She reminds you to pay attention to what you do and think of the consequences of your actions. Like a mother, she helps you; she teaches you to think before you act and to know when you have done wrong and to accept the consequences of your actions.

With the making of my possum skin cloak I realise that I have been missing out on the magic of this creative process. Now that I'm starting to become involved with the art again, I have come up with enough ideas on what I would like to make to last me the next few years. I was hoping to make a living in the arts, be involved with my people and bring Aboriginal art to new places in a new way. There are so many mediums to work with inside the “boundaries” of Aboriginal art.

I think that my possum skin cloak is only the beginning of my journey into making Aboriginal art. I thank my family and the people at Melbourne Museum for helping me to see that and I hope that my life will involve my art in a big way.

Making of the First Peoples ad

Author
by Jareen
Publish date
11 September 2013
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One cold August morning at 5am, a team of us were outside along Birrarung Marr ‘on set’ shooting a commercial for the new First Peoples exhibition. Here are just a few behind the scenes photos of the shoot.

Aunty Fay Carter and Dharna on set. "... Hear our stories, know the joy in our hearts..." Aunty Fay Carter and Dharna on set.
Image: Matthew McCarthy
Source: Clear Design
 

Everyone on set. Final touch up before we begin shooting. Aunty Fay Carter (slightly hidden), Uncle Jack Charles, Dharna Nicholson-Bux and Marbee Williams with the make up artist.
Image: Matthew McCarthy
Source: Clear Design

Marbee and Uncle Jack Charles on set Marbee Williams and Uncle Jack Charles on set with the Melbourne skyline in the background.
Image: Matthew McCarthy
Source: Clear Design
 

The advertising for the First Peoples exhibition is centred around the word Wominjeka. The word means welcome in the local Koorie languages for Melbourne, Boonwurrung and Woi wurrung. You can find out about Victorian Aboriginal languages in the exhibition or our online map.

In the campaign, we feature four Victorian Aboriginal people: Aunty Fay Carter (Yorta Yorta and Dja Dja Wurrung), Uncle Jack Charles (Boonwurrung and Wiradjeri), Marbee Williams (Boonwurrung and Wiradjuri) and Dharna Nicholson-Bux (Wurundjeri and Yorta Yorta).

Dharna with Aunty Fay Dharna with Aunty Fay onset during the First Peoples commercial shoot at Birrarung Marr. August 2013.
Image: Scottie Cameron
Source: Museum Victoria

Uncle Jack Charles Uncle Jack Charles onset during the First Peoples commercial shoot.
Image: Scottie Cameron
Source: Museum Victoria

Marbee Williams. Marbee Williams onset for the First Peoples commercial shoot.
Image: Scottie Cameron
Source: Museum Victoria.
 

If you live in Melbourne, hopefully you will have started seeing the word Wominjeka around town. If you see our posters, ads, brochures, flags or video, snap a photo and use #wominjeka if you're sharing it on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. We'd love to see it!

Example of advertising for First Peoples. Examples of the advertising featuring Marbee Williams and Dharna Nicholson-Bux.
Image: Clear Design
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The campaign development was highly collaborative, taking inspiration from the First Peoples Yulendj (knowledge) Group of Elders and representatives of Aboriginal communities from across Victoria, the First Peoples exhibition and Bunjilaka teams, and taking into consideration the feedback from recent focus group sessions with non-Aboriginal museum visitors.

Huge thanks to everyone who has helped with the development of the campaign!

 

Bunjil's wings

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
9 August 2013
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Outside, you see the vast nest - a thick tangle of branches and feathers - of Bunjil, Kulin creator being and Wedge-tailed Eagle. Within the nest hangs a marvellous kinetic sculpture that represents Bunjil’s wings, the sinuous curves of the Country he created, and the cycle of creation itself. As it moves and glows, Koorie Elders speak of Bunjil singing the Country, Law and people of the Kulin nation into being.

In this video, members of the First Peoples team talk about the Creation Cinema and Bunjil's Nest, and show you a preview of Bunjil's wings in flight.

 

Bunjil’s Nest and the Creation Cinema were developed under the guidance of the First Peoples Yulendj Group and are a creative collaboration between Glenn Romanis (Wedge-tailed Eagle feathers), Synthesis Design + Build (Bunjil’s Nest), ENESS (concept, design, vision and sound for Bunjil’s wings) and Melbourne Museum (overall concept and design).

First Peoples opens to the public on Saturday 7 September 2013 with an all-day festival celebrating Koorie culture.

Installing Many Nations

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
11 July 2013
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Comments (1)

The mammoth task of installing over 480 beautiful, rich and significant objects into the Many Nations section of First Peoples has begun. Early this week the very first item – a substantial wooden carving of Bunjil by Mick Harding – went in to its final position as the crowning object of the Animal Creations showcase.

Man installing a sculpture Anthony Abell with the carving of Bunjil by Mick Harding.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Deb Frost is leading the team of exhibition collection managers carefully placing the objects into the Many Nations display. Explains Deb, "the complexity of these cases is that nearly every object requires a custom support, or mount, designed specifically for that object." Mount-makers from Pod Museum and Art Services have spent recent months making fine, precise metal frames that will show each object at its best, while holding them securely in place. Deb points out that the mount holding Bunjil up high is much beefier than most of the others since "that object alone is 16.5 kilograms and so that mount is specifically designed to take that weight."

John and Ant installing Many Nations display John Duggan and Anthony Abell placing the Bunjil sculpture into its showcase.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

When filled, the showcases will house a stunning array of historical and contemporary objects made by Aboriginal people from all over Australia. Senior Curator Rosemary Wrench looked at over 16,000 historical objects from the museum's collection, selecting ones that have never been on display, while new acquisitions and commissions show continuing and new expressions of culture. Senior Designer Corinne Balaam created a beautiful light filled display to highlight each piece within six cases: Animal Creations, Celebrating Culture, Marking Identity, Keeping Places, Toy Stories and Working Country.

Deb has been working with these objects for many months and has come to know them very well. And which is her favourite? "How do you pick one? They're all amazing," she says. "Bunjil was a treat because that was a commissioned work, but my favourite is in Toy Stories, and that's the doll with the feeding breasts. That's my number one object because I think it's got a wonderful story." This doll will be held in a special mount cast from the hands of Myee Patten. "The childhood stories, that's my soft spot," continues Deb. "All the Elders coming in and speaking about those times - it's wonderful to hear those stores from their childhood some sixty or more years ago, and hearing their memories of learning from their grandparents and Elders."

Deb Frost with drill Deb with the drill rig her team used to drill hundred of precise holes for the custom object mounts in Many Nations.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

As for a favourite showcase, Deb explains, "many of our team love Celebrating Culture because it's all about body adornment, the bracelets and necklaces, which are magnificent, however I love the Marking Identity case with shields that show the colouration and different patterns from state to state. This case packs a punch. It says to me, look how diverse our Indigenous communities are around Australia. The baskets in Keeping Places are gorgeous too; I love the different weaves, the different colours and different types, from the honeypot through to the ceremonial bowl made by Will Patten. It's great to see the new with the old."

Empty showcase The Marking Identity showcase awaiting installation of the shields from around Australia.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

As the crew finalises the installation, their concerns are protecting the precious objects and managing the logistics. "The tricky bits are the technical aspects like accessing the cases, ensuring the stability of mounts, keeping everything clean and free of dust."

"You address all the conservation and collection management needs for those objects and in the end, once they're finally locked away safely in their showcase and on display for the world to see, then everyone's tickled! That's the highlight of our work."

First Peoples opens at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum on 7 September 2013.

Sorry Day 2013

Author
by John Patten
Publish date
4 June 2013
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John Patten is a Bundjalung / Yorta Yorta man on his father's side, and a descendant of First Fleet convicts via his mother. An educator and artist, he takes great joy in sharing knowledge with visitors to Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre.

On Sunday May 26, Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre partnered with Connecting Home to host an event for National Sorry Day. A time for reflection and healing, National Sorry Day pays tribute to the courage and vitality of the many Aboriginal people affected by past policies of forced removal. The day also serves to highlight the work that organisations such as Connecting Home are doing in the service of members of the Stolen Generations, and those similarly affected.

group of people Crowd at the Sorry Day event
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria

The afternoon kicked off with Bunjilaka’s Birrarung gallery being filled by the sounds of William Wandin-Dow’s didgeridoo, followed soon thereafter by a large and attentive crowd, who via MC Bryan Andy were given an appreciation for the significance of Sorry Day.

dancers Seven Sisters dance group
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria

A welcome to Country was performed by Kulin Nation elders Aunty Carolyn Briggs (Boon Wurrung), and Aunty Di Kerr (Woi Wurrung). They spoke of the day and its personal significance to each of them before a warm round of applause and the entrance to the gallery of the Seven Sisters dance troupe, who wowed the crowd with a tightly choreographed and evocative performance.

woman Alice Solomon
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria

The two key speakers for the afternoon then took their turns to speak to the crowd. The first to share her story was Zoe Upton, followed then by Alice Solomon. Both speakers were moving in what they had to say, and their heartfelt words remained in the crowd’s consciousness during the final performance of the afternoon, a clutch of songs sung beautifully and with great humour by the Koorie Skin Choir. 

Links:

Connecting Home

Reconciliation Australia

Recognise

MV Blog: National Sorry Day

MV Blog: Reconciliation Week 2012

The eels are back

Author
by Patrick
Publish date
28 May 2013
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Comments (2)

Last week the Live Exhibits team went into the field in search of eels and other fish to restock the pond in Milarri Garden.

catching fish at night Live Exhibits keeper Adam Elliott demonstrates the best technique for transferring freshwater animals from nets.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Last year the iconic Short-finned Eels (Anguilla australis) living in Milarri pond were moved to the Forest Gallery water system while we repaired and resealed the pond. Now Milarri pond is back in operation and ready for new inhabitants.

Short-finned Eel Short-finned Eel
Image: Rudie Kuiter
Source: Aquatic Photographics
 

Prior to the Milarri pond works, regular eel feeding sessions were very popular with museum visitors, giving our staff the opportunity to highlight the importance of eels as a traditional food source for local Aboriginal people. In western Victoria, kooyang (eel) were trapped using woven nets in sophisticated aquaculture systems by the Gunditjmara people for thousands of years – one of the featured installations of the upcoming First Peoples exhibition at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum.

staff catching fish for Milarri pond Left: Maik Fiedel in deep water, checking his nets. Right: Melvin Nathan ensures the eels are well looked after in holding tubs.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We collected the new eels west of Melbourne under permit, and we also caught other fish such as Tupong (Pseudaphritis urvilli), Flathead Gudgeon (Philypnodon grandiceps) and Common Jollytails (Galaxias maculatus) boost stocks in the Forest Gallery creek and pond system. These are just a few of the 50 or so species of freshwater fish found in Victorian waters.

Native Victorian fish Clockwise from left: Common Jollytail, Flathead Gudgeon, Tupong.
Image: Rudie Kuiter
Source: Aquatic Photographics
 

Freshwater invertebrates, particularly Glass Shrimp (Paratya australis) were also collected to kick start the food chain in Milarri pond. Yabbies (Cherax destructor) will soon walk across land from nearby ponds, and many other invertebrate species will fly in or colonise via new plantings or by adhering to waterbirds. Pacific Black Ducks (Anas superciliosa), Little Pied Cormorants (Microcarbo melanoleucos) and other birds will soon arrive under their own power.

fish in a bucket Young Jollytails and Glass Shrimp swim around under a Water Spider (Megadolomedes species).
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Musuem Victoria
 

At the end of the collection trip, animal keepers Chloe and Dave released the eels into their new home, where they will live under the care of Live Exhibit staff for many years.

Man releasing bucket of fish Dave Paddock releases the last of the eels into Milarri pond.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Fish destined for the Forest Gallery must be quarantined for three weeks in tanks set up behind the scenes to ensure no parasites or pathogens are introduced to our resident fish population.

Live Exhibits lab at night Dave sets up Tupong in quarantine some time after midnight in the Live Exhibits Lab.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

A range of fish species as well as Macquarie Turtles (Emydura macquarii) can be seen daily in the Forest Gallery at Melbourne Museum. Silver Perch (Bidyanus bidyanus) and eel feeding presentations will recommence at Milarri pond in September when the water starts to warm and the eels’ appetites return.

Milarri Garden and Milarri Walk are open every day of the year except Christmas Day and Good Friday. 

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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