Bunjilaka

DISPLAYING POSTS FILED UNDER: Bunjilaka (30)

Bunjilaka

Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum is a dynamic living cultural centre with an Indigenous garden, artists' space and exhibition gallery celebrating Victoria’s Koorie people and the relationship between Aboriginal people and the land.

Waa and the Seven Sisters

Author
by John Patten
Publish date
11 January 2013
Comments
Comments (3)

John Patten is a Bundjalung / Yorta Yorta man on his father's side, and a descendant of First Fleet convicts via his mother. An educator and artist, he takes great joy in sharing knowledge with visitors to Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre.

This summer Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum presents a follow-up to our successful Tiddalik the Thirsty Frog theatre show, with a local Kulin creation story – Waa and the Seven Sisters.

  woman in wig Nikki Ashby performing as the Seventh Sister.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The story tells how the Kulin peoples (the traditional owners of Melbourne and surrounding areas) were given the secret of fire by their creator, Bunjil, who often takes the form of an eagle. The story focuses on how the gift of fire was given to seven old women, who instead of sharing with the rest of the Kulin decided to keep fire for themselves. Thus, the Kulin's protector Waa (the Crow) conjured a plan to ensure the secret of fire is shared with everyone.

Woman in bird costume Uraine Mastrosavas performing as Waa the Crow.
Source: Museum Victoria

The show's cast this year are Uraine Mastrosavas, who we are very pleased to have back with us, after having been part of last year's Tiddalik the Thirsty Frog shows, and Nikki Ashby, an actor, dancer and choreographer. The show is directed by Michael Camilleri.

Theatre set with purple lights A dramatic moment on the set of Waa and the Seven Sisters.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Audiences are a major part of the show, making up part of the cast and interacting with the performers both on and off stage. There is plenty of music, singing, laughing and dancing.

boy in bird mask A young member of the audience performing as Jert-Jert.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre also has a free summer activity running in the Birrarung gallery where children and their families can make and colour in their own Bunjil the Wedge-tailed Eagle glider, decorated with traditional Victorian Koorie art motifs, to take home.

Waa and the Seven Sisters runs until 28 January at 11:00 AM, noon and 1:00pm, every day except Saturdays. Adults $10, children $5, MV Members receive discount admission.

Links:

What's On: Waa and the Seven Sisters 

Melbourne Museum School Holiday Program

Help us plan our future

Author
by Melinda
Publish date
9 November 2012
Comments
Comments (5)

Melinda is the manager of MV's Governance and Planning Department.

Between our three museums—Melbourne Museum, Scienceworks and the Immigration Museum— we exhibit world cultures, the science of our planet and universe, and Victoria's history and biodiversity. We take the show on the road and online, through the Discovery Program and our website.

Teacher with students Point Lonsdale Primary School students at the launch of the Surprises of the Cosmos exhibition at Scienceworks in 2011.
Image: Ben Healley
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Woman in gallery Muthi Muthi Elder and artist Aunty Barb Egan with one of her artworks in her River Woman exhibition that was on show at Birrarung Gallery, Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre earlier this year.
Image: James Henry
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We also look after the Royal Exhibition Building, and our 158-year-old scientific and cultural collections assist research into critical contemporary issues.

Dancers at Flinders St King Marong and members of the Safara Music School perform outside Flinders Street Station at the media launch of the West Africa exhibition at the Immigration Museum, 2010.
Image: Heath Warwick
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Planning for Museum Victoria's future is a mammoth and exciting task. We would like to hear what you value about Museum Victoria to help us steer the museum on behalf of all Victorians.

Please tell us: What do you like best about Museum Victoria? What do you think we could be doing better? What new things would you like to see us doing in the future?

You can leave your answers as a comment on this post, or if you'd prefer to reply privately, drop us a line via the Discovery Centre form

First Peoples' Cultural Workshops

Author
by John Patten
Publish date
20 September 2012
Comments
Comments (2)

John Patten is a Bundjalung / Yorta Yorta man on his father's side, and a descendant of First Fleet convicts via his mother. An educator and artist, he takes great joy in sharing knowledge with visitors to Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre.

In preparation for an upcoming series of cultural workshops to be held at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum, I recently ventured into the field with John Duggan to collect a range of materials required to run the workshops.

Man on a beach John Duggan searching the beach for suitable rocks.
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria
 

John is a Gamilaroi man and the Assistant Collections Manager for Australian Collections in MV's Humanities Department. Together we travelled to south western Victoria to collect flint for making traditional stone knapped spear points and blades, Pomaderris shafts for the production of spears, Xanthorrhoea (Grass Tree) resin for making a traditional glue, and several varieties of timber for carving traditional tools and weapons, including shields, digging sticks, clubs and boomerangs.

John Patten with rocks John Patten selecting beach rocks for the workshops
Image: John Duggan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Man holding rock John Duggan selecting rocks suitable for making traditional knapped spear points and blades.
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria
 

During our journey we encountered a wide variety of flora and fauna, ranging from herds of emus and large mobs of kangaroos, to wombats and echidna. We also facilitated a special intervention, where John Duggan removed a dozen or more bush ticks from the body of a Shingleback lizard. Traditional food and medicinal plants that we encountered included Pig Face, Kangaroo Apple, Salt Bush and Red Fruit Saw Sedge.

wombat A baby wombat among bracken encountered during the trip.
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Stars in the night sky The night sky above south western Victoria during the trip.
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The First Peoples' Cultural Workshops, which will become a regular part of Bunjilaka's programming, are part of an aim to build a central knowledge base for Koorie artists, to equip them with the necessary resources to pass along a range of traditional skills and knowledge to their own communities across Victoria and beyond.

The first workshop will be delivered by John Duggan, who is acknowledged as a skilled artist and creator of traditional stone tools.

Stone Knapping Workshop
Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Friday 5 October, 10:30am – 3:00pm
For further information or to book your place in the Cultural Workshop series, please contact John Patten on 03 8341 7352

Nicky Winmar's jumper

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
18 September 2012
Comments
Comments (2)

Throughout the 17 April 1993 St Kilda vs Collingwood match at Victoria Park, Collingwood supporters hurled racist taunts at two Aboriginal St Kilda players. At the end of the game, with St Kilda victorious, midfielder Nicky Winmar lifted his guernsey and pointed proudly at his skin. 

Nicky Winmar's AFL jumper Nicky Winmar's 1993 AFL season jumper, which he was wearing when he made his famous stand against racism in sport.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Photographs of this spontaneous gesture became a powerful symbol of Aboriginal pride and a statement about the problem of racism in sport. Historian Joy Damousi was in the audience at the match and reflected upon that moment on a May episode of ABC Radio National's 'Life Matters'.

This particular moment is really one of the most significant events in Australian cultural history...A simple material object that can encapsulate an era, a mood, a period, a turning point and Nicky Winmar's jumper does that beautifully...

Museum Victoria held a celebratory event at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum this morning to announce our acquisition of Winmar's jumper. The year after the famous gesture, Winmar traded the jumper with his friend Tim O'Brien, a former basketballer for the NBL. O'Brien put the jumper up for sale in May this year with the proceeds planned to fund a documentary film about racism in sport. MV purchased it for display in Bunjilaka's forthcoming First Peoples exhibition, using funds reserved for acquiring important objects for the museum's collections.

After reflecting on Nicky's brave action on that momentous day in 1993, Bunjilaka Manager Caroline Martin, Museum Victoria CEO Dr Patrick Greene and Tim O'Brien unveiled the jumper together at the event this morning, much to the excitement of those gathered around.

People with St Kilda football jumper L-R: Dr Patrick Greene, Tim O'Brien and Caroline Martin with Nicky Winmar's jumper this morning.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

"This jumper represents a proud moment in history for Australia's First Peoples," said Caroline Martin. "It symbolises pride and strength in our culture and we are delighted that future visitors to Bunjilaka will be able to commemorate the inspirational story behind this jumper, as we did today." 

Links:

'The day the game changed' by Nabila Ahmed, The Age19 April 2003

Reed necklace

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
11 September 2012
Comments
Comments (2)

173 years ago today, on 11 September 1839, a reed necklace held in the MV Collection was collected in the Melbourne area by George Augustus Robinson. The necklace is one of five he collected during his tenure as Chief Protector of Aborigines for Port Phillip (1839-1849).

reed necklace Reed necklace collected by GA Robinson in 1839. It is made from 162 hollow reed segments strung on vegetable string. (X84452)
Image: Photograph: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The necklace belonged to a man from Port Phillip whose name was recorded as Po.un.deet (elsewhere spelled Wo.un.deek or Porrundeet). In his later journals, Robinson recorded the name for the reed necklace as teer.er.rer.gone.burt, and observed the local custom of presenting necklaces as a greeting to friends. In an entry from 6 June 1841 he described what happened when a family visited his station:

Mar.ke, the native woman at Tulloh's [property], after some mutual exploration appeared highly pleased at meeting with my native attendants. She recognized an old acquaintance and, without ceremony, took the kangaroo teeth ornaments that adorned his hair and reed necklace that adorned his neck and decorated her child therewith. This I observed to be the custom of the natives when meeting with friends.

The wonderful story of Porrundeet's teer.er.rer.gone.burt will feature in the Many Nations section of the new First Peoples exhibition at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre.

Links:

GA Robinson, Protector of Aborigines (State Library of NSW)

Sir David drops in

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
21 August 2012
Comments
Comments (8)

Sir David Attenborough, in Melbourne for a speaking tour, visited Melbourne Museum unannounced last Wednesday with his daughter. Although he's best known for his natural history work, Sir David is fascinated by anthropology. He has collected Australian Aboriginal shields for many years, including rainforest shields from Queensland, and was keen to see local examples from the MV Indigenous Cultures Collection.

The seemingly unfortunate timing of his visit – Bunjilaka's permanent exhibitions are temporarily closed for redevelopment – actually turned out to be very good timing. Sir David mentioned to Kim Kaal in customer service that he had hoped to see Aboriginal shields on display. Quick-thinking Kim grabbed Bunjilaka's John Patten as he was walking past. Within a few minutes, John and colleague Kimberly Moulton arranged a tour of the collection store where the Bunjilaka Redevelopment Team has been working on the object-rich Many Nations section of the new exhibition, First Peoples.

David Attenborough with museum staff Sir David Attenborough with members of the Bunjilaka Redevelopment Team, looking at objects selected for display in First Peoples.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Sir David spent almost an hour talking with curators and collection staff about the objects selected for the exhibition. Rosemary Wrench, the curator of Many Nations, says that he was fascinated by the objects and asked detailed questions about their provenance, designs, creation and use. He was especially pleased to hear that First Peoples will have such a strong focus on the people and cultures of south-eastern Australia. His considerable knowledge about artefacts was apparent, but he was still wonderfully surprised by unfamiliar items, such as possum jaws used to engrave designs into tools and objects.

David Attenborough with museum staff Curator Rosemary Wrench talking with Sir David Attenborough about objects selected for First Peoples.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Sir David's favourite object was an etched shield from New South Wales. He examined it for some time and said, "That is magnificent, and worth a trip all the way to Australia just to see this." He was also particularly interested in a Victorian spear thrower and its ornate designs; he studied it very closely and described it as "remarkable and intriguing." He was very glad to hear that these and other treasures will be on display in First Peoples.

Aboriginal shield front and back Aboriginal shield from New South Wales, showing the elaborately carved front and the handle at the back. (X1047)
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria

Detail of Aboriginal shield Detail of the exquisite carving on the front of the NSW shield.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

About this blog

Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

Categories