Events and Programs

DISPLAYING POSTS FILED UNDER: Events and Programs (124)

Events and Programs

Lectures, community festivals, activities for kids - lots of stuff to see and do!

Invertebrate Keeper Workshop

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
12 August 2014
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Children are sponges: if kids see and hear that invertebrates are fascinating, wonderful and complex, they are eager to appreciate them. Likewise, the next generation of spider-squashers is created when children are told only that bugs and spiders are disgusting, dangerous or scary. Naturally, when you get a roomful of invertebrate keepers from zoos and fauna parks in a room, they’ll discuss how best to show kids that invertebrates are magnificent.

Invertebrate Keeper Training Workshop Invertebrate Keeper Training Workshop participants ponder the big issues with Maik from Live Exhibits: how do you know if your millipede is male or female?
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

And so it was at the Invertebrate Keeper Training Workshop at Melbourne Museum last week. Presented by the Australasian Society of Zoo Keeping (ASZK) and run by Jessie, Chloe and Patrick from MV Live Exhibits, the workshop covered all kinds of techniques for keeping, breeding and displaying living invertebrates, and their educational value. When I dropped in, they were poised to begin a snail race—a contest of extreme athleticism where snails compete to reach the edge of a circular arena.

Snail race And they're off! Snails racing.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The purpose of the race was to show ways to get kids thinking about the biology of minibeasts. Jessie from Live Exhibits explained that in the time it took for the snails to slide over the finish line, you can discuss why they prefer to crawl over damp surfaces, why they don’t like being blown upon, and other quirks of snail life. Jessie also described an excellent way to overcome insect fear in small children while holding large invertebrates like stick insects. “Ask them, can you see its eyes? Can you see the claws on its feet? And they come closer and closer without realising it.”

The workshop also covered how to house, feed and breed invertebrates; how to collect them legally and ethically, and how to keep populations healthy. Participants also got a tour of the Live Exhibits back of house facilities where the museum’s invertebrate colonies are kept, our Entomology collections, and a trip to Melbourne Zoo to see their Butterfly House. Invertebrate keepers talk about stuff you don’t hear every day, like how to breed whip scorpions (it’s tricky but not impossible), and what type of heating to use create a humid insect room (hydronic is best).

And the winner of the snail race? This tearaway Garden Snail streaked across the line not once, but twice, before most of the others had even left the centre ring. The Phar Lap of the snail world. 

winning snail The winner of the snail race glides over the finish line.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Discovering Mexican Food

Author
by Adrienne Leith
Publish date
1 August 2014
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Adrienne creates and presents public programs at Melbourne Museum.

White bean soup, crunchy crickets, sweet amaranth tamales. Sound familiar? If you've visited Mexico, perhaps, but for many of the guests at the museum's June master classes, the food of the Aztecs was surprising and new.

Crunchy crickets dish Crunchy crickets dish
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Mexican food and particularly its Aztec roots were presented by those in the know: three VIP food experts who flew into Melbourne from Mexico for a unique opportunity to highlight the Aztecs exhibition on display at Melbourne Museum.

Two visiting Mexican chefs Two of the VIP Mexican chefs. Left: Yuri de Gortari, Head Chef. Right: Leon Aguirre, Sous-chef and translator
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The three VIPs established the School of Gastronomy, History, Art and Culture in Mexico and for more than a decade have researched and presented Mexican food history. Yuri de Gortari is the Head Chef of the school and is a well known Mexican television celebrity, presenting traditional Mexican recipes on morning TV. Sous-chef and translator Leon Aguirre has just recorded his first television series focusing on more modern Mexican food. And behind the scenes, Edmundo Escamilla has been undertaking research on Mexican food history for the past two decades, amassing thousands of historic recipes.

Agriculture was practised in Mexico as early as 7,000 BC. Early cultivation, of corn and chillies, expanded over the millennia to include tomatoes, amaranth, chia, vanilla, avocado, papaya and guava. By the time the Spanish arrived in the early 16th century, the Emperor's table proffered 'a large feast... with a type of gold cup serving cocoa drinks scented with vanilla; a large variety of rabbits and hares, as well as wild boar, venison, partridges, pheasants, ducks and turkey, all of them prepared in a variety of different sauces, and a wide variety of fruits from all over the Empire.*' 

Guests at the master classes didn't quite get Moctezuma's feast but were treated to a menu which started and finished with tamales, one savoury, one sweet. Tamales are corn husks stuffed with goodies such as beans or amaranth, a small seed that looks like sesame. Edmundo has collected more than 5,000 recipes for tamales.

Man in kitchen Food Historian Edmundo Escamilla preparing tamales for guests at the masterclass.
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The savoury black bean tamales were followed by the fried grasshopper dish, reportedly tasting like anchovies. Then came a delicious white bean soup with strips of pickled cactus, followed by fish in an Acuyo sauce made from the Piper auritum plant indigenous to tropical Mesoamerica. This plant is used to make green sauce (mole verde), and to flavour meats, tamale mixes, eggs, soups, chocolate drinks, goats' cheese and a liquor called Verdin.

Two Mexican dishes Delicious Mexican food. Left: tamales - steamed beans wrapped in corn husks. Right: Fish in Acuyo Sauce.
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The last savoury dish was rabbit with guajillo chillies. Apparently there are at least nine indigenous species of rabbit in Mexico and two types of hare. Along with fish, turkey, dog, duck, possum, peccary and armadillo, rabbit was common Aztec fare, and continues to be popular in Mexico today. The chefs used a wide range of chillies in their dishes from fat chocolatey-looking ones to fine red hot slim chillies, but said that chillies were meant to be used for their deep flavouring of dishes not for their heat.

Two Mexican dishes More tasty dishes the Aztecs would know. Left: White bean soup with strips of pickled cactus. Right: Rabbit slow-cooked in chilli and tomato.
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Sweets and sweet drinks are common in Mexico and the guests were treated to cacao flavoured water and a selection of amaranth candy and peanut candy to round off the day. The cacao beans were handed around for taste, and the bitterness was distinct. Apparently it was only in Victorian times that sugar was added to cacao to make what we know as the flavour of chocolate today.

Mexican cooking master class Maste rclass goodies. Left: a display of types of grain. Right: showbags!
Image: Rob Zugaro
Source: Museum Victoria
 

With a bag of goodies donated by Mexican businesses around Melbourne including sweets, tortillas, sauces and candies, guests left knowing more of the cuisine that has influenced the world since the Spanish conquest and a greater understanding the wholesome, balanced and nutritious gastronomy of the Aztecs.

The master classes were developed by the Education and Community Programs team at Melbourne Museum as part of the Aztecs exhibition. The Mexican VIPs were brought to Melbourne by the Mexican Embassy of Australia especially for the master classes. Peter Rowland Catering at Melbourne Museum partnered and supported the events in the Treetops Restaurant at Melbourne Museum.

* Source: Notes provided by the School of Gastronomy, History, Art and Culture, Mexico City

National Science Week - Meet the Scientists

Author
by Priscilla
Publish date
30 July 2014
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Priscilla is a Program Coordinator for Life Sciences and works on education programs at Melbourne Museum.

In National Science Week this year, we're running a special program called Meet the Scientists just for students in Years 9 and 10.

If you're a teacher, you can book your Year 9 or 10 classes in to chat with our researchers about their day jobs. And if you're not, here's a taste of what the students will get: interviews with scientists who work on our natural history collections.

Meet Mel Mackenzie, Collection Manager of Marine Invertebrates

From scallops to squids, crabs to octopuses, Mel’s day job sounds more like she works in a restaurant than a museum. That is until she gets into the nudibranchs, echinoderms, flatworms, sponges, isopods and jellyfishes – just to name a few. Meet Mel Mackenzie.

Mel looking down microscope Mel Mackenzie, Collection Manager of Marine Invertebrates, on an Antarctic research trip.
Image: Pete Lens (BAS)
Source: Museum Victoria
 

How did you get into being a Collection Manager?

I started working at the museum as a volunteer docent in 1994, educating public visitors in various marine exhibitions while studying Zoology at Melbourne University. From there I moved down to the dungeons of the previous location of the museum on Russell Street as a volunteer research assistant to Dr. C.C. Lu, busily counting squid suckers and tentacles to assist in descriptions of new species. I went on to work as a Relocations Officer during the Museum move from Russell Street, then as an assistant collection manager in Invertebrate Zoology at various temporary locations before finally settling at Melbourne Museum.

After a ten-year stint away (in Learning, Development, Training and Publishing both here and in Japan) I’ve now been back working in the collections at Melbourne Museum since 2010.

Which collections do you look after?

The Marine Invertebrate Collection, though we do also have some freshwater invertebrates (like crayfish) and also some land snails and slugs. The collection is a specimen 'library' of everything from tiny tanaids (a type of crustacean) to giant squids. We keep the collection organised, viable and accessible for ongoing morphological, genetic, and environmental research. 

Have you got a favourite marine invertebrate?

Holothurians; more commonly known as Sea Cucumbers. Apart from my usual collection management responsibilities, I get to work closely with other scientists on this group of animals and contribute through fieldwork, lab work, research and photography to a variety of scientific projects and publications. I’ve been lucky enough to have travelled to Poland, the Falklands and even the Weddell Sea in Antarctica to collect and identify these curious critters.

 

Meet Dr Erich Fitzgerald, Senior Curator of Palaeontology

When you’re studying the past, life came in many more forms than just the dinosaurs. Palaeontologists study fossil birds, plants, snakes, insects, or even pollen, which all help us to build up a picture of the past. Meet Dr Erich Fitzgerald.

Erich with whale skull Dr Erich Fitzgerald, with the fossil skull of the early whale Janjucetus hunderi.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

What area of palaeontology do you specialise in?

I investigate the evolutionary history of aquatic vertebrates, especially marine mammals such as whales, seals and sea cows. This research involves exploring the fossil record as well as investigating aquatic adaptations of living species. I seek to document the diversity, evolutionary relationships and palaeobiology of marine vertebrates through time and uncover the drivers of their evolution and extinction.

How did you get your job?

I studied earth science and zoology as part of a Bachelors of Science at Melbourne University, and then studied fossil whales for my PhD at Monash University. I was then a Smithsonian Institution Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, and more recently was the Harold Mitchell Fellow at Museum Victoria (2009–2012) before getting my job as the Senior Curator.

What are you researching now?

My major ongoing program of research involves the documentation and analysis of the little-studied fossil record of marine mammals in Australia, exploring how and when the remarkable biological adaptations of today’s whales, dolphins and seals evolved. I am interested in the questions opened up by looking at extinct and living marine mammals as a continuum: to understand the present we must grasp the past. That’s what Wallace and Darwin showed us: life only makes sense in light of its evolution.

Links:

Meet the Scientists program

National Science Week

Rare Books wrap-up

Author
by Gemma
Publish date
28 July 2014
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Gemma is a librarian at Museum Victoria.

On Saturday 19 July, a panel of experts came together for an Antiques Roadshow-style event where members of the public were invited to come along and have their books, maps and prints appraised.

The experts were kept busy throughout the event. The experts were kept busy throughout the event.
Image: Gemma Steele
Source: Museum Victoria
 

This is the second year running that Melbourne Museum has run the Rare Book Discovery Day as part of Rare Book Week, and this year was bigger and better. Our panel of experts extended to include Gerry Dorset (Brighton Antique Prints and Maps), Mick Stone (Camberwell Books & Collectibles), and Michael O’Brien (Bradstreet’s Books) who were great additions to rare book sellers Stuart Kells (Books of Kells), Peter Arnold (Peter Arnold Rare Books). Museum Victoria’s paper conservator, Belinda Gourley was on hand again this year, and was kept busy providing advice on caring for books and giving recommendations for correct storage.

paper conservato giving advice on caring for a book Museum Victoria’s paper conservator, Belinda Gourley giving advice on caring for a stunningly-illustrated book of fairy tales.
Image: Gemma Steele
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Some interesting items were uncovered, including prints of the Titanic, German calendars from the 1960s, a two-volume English dictionary from the 18th century, and a collection of some very rare serials on migration to British colonies. Many of the items were of high sentimental value rather than high market value, although our highest valuation this year was nearly $5000!

One of the more unusual items on the day: a plan for the removal of the Benevolent Asylum, North Melbourne. One of the more unusual items on the day: a plan for the removal of the Benevolent Asylum, North Melbourne.
Image: Gemma Steele
Source: Museum Victoria
 

If you're a fan of rare books, maps, prints and ephemera, don't miss several items from the Museum Victoria Library’s historic rare book collection on display as part of The Art of Science. This exhibition opens at Melbourne Museum on 19 September 2014 and will run until 1 February 2015.

Meet the Rescuers!

Author
by Murray
Publish date
23 July 2014
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Murray is a Programs Officer at Scienceworks.

Rescue: Live kicked off at Scienceworks on Saturday 12 July with the arrival of the High Angle Rescue Team of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade. More than 400 Scienceworks visitors braved the cold to witness the daring and skills of the MFB as they demonstrated how they can save people trapped on skyscrapers and cliff-faces with their special equipment, ropes and rigging.

Rescue Live Visitors to Scienceworks look on eagerly as the MFB High Angle Rescue Team specialists prepare for their demonstration.
Source: MFB

Rescue Live Meet the mannequin! Excited children speak with an MFB specialist about a mannequin dummy used in a mock rescue
Source: MFB

Rescue Live A crowd gathers to inspect how the MFB specialists can save people trapped on skyscrapers and cliff-faces with their special equipment, ropes and rigging.
Source: MFB

Rescue Live MFB specialists use their equipment to demonstrate to a gasping crowd how they can save people in trapped in precarious situations.
Source: MFB
 

The Rescue: Live program gives our visitors the chance to interact with members from several emergency response teams and see how they help keep Australians safe. The program also gives the organisations the opportunity to raise awareness of their services to the community, and is an action-packed accompaniment to our Rescue exhibition. On selected weekends until 14 September, come see safety specialists show their stuff in the arena, the amphitheatre or inside the Scienceworks building.

Rescue: Live program

Taking care of your rare books

Author
by Gemma
Publish date
11 July 2014
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Gemma is a librarian at Museum Victoria.

Of course we all love books, but, if I have learned anything from compulsively reading Pride and Prejudice year on year it is this: sometimes we hurt the ones we love. So with Melbourne Rare Book Week fast approaching, whether you are a keen collector or someone who has come across a hidden gem in the garage, here are five golden rules to follow to take care of your own collection:

1. Wash your hands

When reading or flicking through your books make sure your hands are clean and dry because oils, perspiration, dirt and food residue can cause a lot of damage.

A Book Conservator at Work A conservator carefully handles a book. Preventive conservation protocols protect the lifespan of cultural objects while allowing them to be viewed safely.
Source: Creative Commons via Wikicommons.
 

2. Be gentle!

Some books will not want to lie open at 180 degrees; if the spine does not want to bend in a particular way then it is best not to force it as this can cause damage. Turn pages from the side rather than the corner and when removing books from a shelf always pull it from the sides rather than the top of the spine.

3. Light and temperature

Keep your book collection in a cool place with minimal exposure to light and away from areas with radiators or vents.

4. Storage

Store books either upright or lying flat, not leaning at an angle. Books should be supported on either side by books or book stands of similar size, and it is best not to pack the books in too tightly. Large, heavy folio-size books are best stored flat.

books on a shelf An example of bad book storage!
Image: Jon Sullivan
Source: Books on a shelf by Jon Sullivan
 

5. Dust regularly

Dust your books often as dust can quickly accumulate on books. It is very important to remember that, if the conditions are right, dust can be a food source for mould and mildew!

Another important tip would be not to attempt to carry out any books repairs yourself. While it may be tempting, you may end up damaging the book further and reducing its value. Museum Victoria’s paper conservator will be on hand to offer advice on caring for books and other printed material at our Rare Book Discovery Day on Saturday 19 July. Also on the panel of experts at this free event will be leading antiquarian book, print and map dealers who can assess and appraise your items.

Rare Book Discovery Day is part of Melbourne Rare Book Week. Check out the Rare Book Week website for more events around town.

Links

MV Blog: Rare Book Discovery Day 2013

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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