Events and Programs

DISPLAYING POSTS FILED UNDER: Events and Programs (116)

Events and Programs

Lectures, community festivals, activities for kids - lots of stuff to see and do!

Guide to Victorian butterflies

Author
by Simon
Publish date
10 September 2013
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Dr Ross Field, a former head of Sciences at Museum Victoria, has compiled a spectacular book on one of his passions: butterflies of Victoria. Butterflies: Identification and life history is the result of many years of painstaking work on Ross’s part and covers all aspects of the lifecycle of these eternally popular insects.

Egg Tailed Emperor Butterfly Lateral view of the Tailed Emperor Butterfly egg
Image: Simon Hinkley & Ken Walker
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Incredible images take readers through the lifecycle of each species from egg, through caterpillar and the food plant it eats, pupa and finally adult. The magnified images of the eggs are stunning and allow us to view and admire objects usually too small to notice. The eggs can be ornamented, ribbed, round or cigar shaped and come in a range of colours. Depending on the viewer some people see a range of jellies or blancmanges when they look at some of these images, (or maybe that’s just me). In fact a selection of these egg shots is touring selected Victorian cultural venues as part of The Art of Science exhibition.

  Caterpillar larva Tailed Emperor Caterpillar of the Tailed Emperor Butterfly
Image: Ross Field
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Collecting the eggs of numerous species for photographing was a big undertaking; Ross has spent many hours in a host of locations watching butterflies circle until they land to lay their eggs. A sample of the eggs were collected and brought back to Melbourne Museum to be photographed using our camera/microscope set up. Prior to this book, anyone other than an expert who collected an egg would have to wait until the egg hatched and the caterpillar had reached one of its later instars before being able to hazard a guess at the species. With this new guide, the ability for the general public to undertake identifications in the field is greatly expanded.    

Pupa Tailed Emperor Pupa of the Tailed Emperor Butterfly
Image: Ross Field
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The egg images might also raise questions such as why do butterflies from the Pieridae family tend to lay cigar shaped eggs? Why do the eggs of some species have a series of lateral ribs running around the surface? Is there an evolutionary advantage to laying sculptured eggs? In short, this comprehensive field guide gives a new vision into the fascinating world of Victorian butterflies and helps to educate and provoke our interest into further research and conservation. 

Adult Tailed Emperor butterfly Adult Tailed Emperor Butterfly
Image: Ross Field
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Links:

Butterflies: Identification and life history. A Museum Victoria field guide by Ross Field. Available in paperback from MV shops or as an eBook from  iTunes or Booktopia.

Melbourne Zoo: 10 steps to a butterfly garden

Drawing class in the Discovery Centre

Author
by Max
Publish date
5 September 2013
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We recently had a request from Debbie Mourtzios, a teacher at Box Hill Institute, to hold a drawing class for Graphic Design students at the Discovery Centre using natural science specimens.

Discovery Centre Drawing class Discovery Centre Drawing class
Image: Debbie Mourtzios
Source: Debbie Mourtzios
 

As the theme of the class was texture, Debbie asked if we could supply examples of fur, feathers, scales, claws, wings, or anything that can illustrate textures.

  Discovery Centre Drawing class Discovery Centre Drawing class
Image: Debbie Mourtzios
Source: Debbie Mourtzios
 

We contacted our Vertebrates Collection Manager who gladly loaned us specimens from the Mammal, Bird and Herpetology collections. We also used specimens in the DC’s interpretive collection. We had bird wings, an echidna, a glass sponge skeleton, a bird of paradise, various bones, reptiles, shark egg cases, all on tables in the Seminar Room, plus all the interpretive collection objects in the Discovery Centre itself. They were not wont for variety.

  Discovery Centre Drawing class Discovery Centre Drawing class
Image: Max Strating
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The eighteen students spent two hours drawing the various specimens. It was very rewarding to watch the students using the centre and its resources; it was also unusually quiet for such a large group. I guess that’s what focused attention sounds like.

Discovery Centre Drawing class Discovery Centre Drawing class
Image: Debbie Mourtzios
Source: Debbie Mourtzios
 

Links

Victoria & Albert Museum

Premiere of Federation Handbells composition

Author
by Susan Bamford Caleo
Publish date
30 July 2013
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Susan is the Federation Handbells Officer at Museum Victoria.

On Thursday 11th July, Arts Centre Melbourne rang out to the sounds of the Federation Handbells in the world premiere of Welcome. The handbells were played by internationally acclaimed composer/percussionist Steve Falk with students from Blackburn High School. It launched the 2013 Sounds Great! Conference for the Association of Music Educators (aMuse) and was received with great enthusiasm and delight.

playing federation bells The world premiere of Welcome performed by Steve Falk and students from Blackburn High
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

The Federation Handbells are a collection of beautifully crafted, tuned bells, originally commissioned by Arts Victoria for the 2001 Centenary of Federation. These bells are available on loan for public or private events, local festivals, school programs, commemorative occasions and performances. Earlier in 2013 Museum Victoria approached the organisers of the conference to have a Federation Handbells display or workshop as part of the program and was invited not only to take part but to open the event. The ‘Welcome’ project was born.

playing the federation bells The world premiere of Welcome performed by Steve Falk and students from Blackburn High School
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Museum Victoria commissioned Steve Falk to compose a piece for the Federation Handbells that could bring together performers of various levels of musical ability and provide a meaningful musical experience for musicians and non-musicians alike. Steve met this challenge beautifully and has created a piece that can be rehearsed and performed as a secondary school music project or by community groups at music festivals or other public events.

playing the federation bells Steve Falk and students from Blackburn High School rehearse Welcome
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

We are thrilled to say that the Welcome composition will be freely available as a resource on the MV Federation Handbells website from October 2013. As well as the score there will be notes about the composition and two short films, one that takes us behind the scenes with interviews and rehearsal footage, and the other that shows the premiere performance at Arts Centre Melbourne.

The Welcome project invites you to experience the wonderful potential to bring people together creatively with the Federation Handbells. It is an opportunity to be inspired!

The Federation Handbells are managed by Museum Victoria's Outreach Program on behalf of Arts Victoria. To make a booking request please follow this link to the Federation Handbells website.

Rare Book Discovery Day

Author
by Hayley
Publish date
23 July 2013
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On Saturday 20 July, four antiquarian booksellers and the museum's paper conservator joined forces to provide a free valuation and conservation service to the public as part of Melbourne Rare Book Week 2013. Peter Arnold (Peter Arnold Antiquarian Booksellers), Justin Healy (Grub Street Bookshop), Stuart Kells (Books of Kells) and Douglas Stewart (Douglas Stewart Fine Books) spent three hours assessing inherited or collected items for their market value. Paper Conservator Belinda Gourley spoke to visitors about appropriate storage and care of old or rare books.

It was interesting to see the variety of material that visitors brought along, which ranged from a Walter Scott novel to an early nineteenth century musical notation book.

Three women looking at a book Conservator Belinda Gourley provides some storage and care advice for a musical notation book dating from 1804.
Image: Hayley Webster
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The find of the day was a 1907 exhibition catalogue of women's work held at the Royal Exhibition Building.

Women's Work catalogue 1907 catalogue of women's work
Source: Kay Craddock
 

This was of particular interest to library staff, as our Rare Book Collection includes a range of exhibition catalogues relating to exhibitions held at the Royal Exhibition Building. We also took the chance to show off a couple of items from our own rare book collection, including the very rare A Monograph of the Psittacidae or Parrot Family of Australia, which is held by only two libraries worldwide.

Three people looking at rare book Library Manager Leonie Cash displaying Monograph of the Psittacidae or Parrot Family of Australia by Rev. J. J. Halley to booksellers Peter Arnold and Justin Healy.
Image: Hayley Webster
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The event was great fun, and it was fantastic to participate in the second Melbourne Rare Book Week. Thanks to everyone who attended!

Links:

Follow Melbourne Rare Book Week on Facebook

View digitised plates from A Monograph of the Psittacidae or Parrot Family of Australia on the Google Art Project

Time Lens app for holiday visits

Author
by Mirah Lambert
Publish date
8 July 2013
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Mirah is the Online Learning Manager.

We’ve been a bit app happy of late, from the recent release of Museum Victoria's Field Guide to Victorian Fauna for Android to new apps based on its code mentioned in the previous blog post.

Just in time for the start of the winter school holidays we've released another free app, Time Lens, designed for kids and their families to enhance a visit to Melbourne Museum.

The curious curator with the Time Lens The curious curator with the Time Lens.
Image: Stray Puppet
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Time Lens Episode 1: Treasures and Gems is a scavenger hunt around the museum, where you solve puzzles to assist our curious curator in finding 15 objects and uncovering their fascinating stories. When found, each of the objects comes to life on your screen and tells you about its past.

Screenshot of Time Lens app Screenshot of the Time Lens app.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

As you play you also achieve badges and gain recognition as a History Harvester, Science Sleuth, Treasure Hunter and, if you find them all, as Museum Master. You can even trade in your virtual badges for real ones as part of the launch of the app at Melbourne Museum these holidays.

The app is available for Apple and Android devices and is about 85-90 MB. This means it is too big to download over 3G, but can be downloaded over a wireless network. If you’re keen to play we encourage you to download it before you come. Otherwise, it is possible to connect to the museum's public wifi network and download it when you arrive at Melbourne Museum.

Using Time Lens app in Forest Gallery Young visitors earning the Time Lens Forest Frolicker badge.
Source:  Museum Victoria
 

Families have been seen eagerly hunting around the museum, discovering treasures and hidden gems. If you want to find out more, we are activating the Time Lens twice daily as part of the school holiday programs, with an introduction to the app and support with downloading at 10:30am and 12:30pm each day. 

Links:

Melbourne Museum winter school holiday program

MV's mobile apps

Sorry Day 2013

Author
by John Patten
Publish date
4 June 2013
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John Patten is a Bundjalung / Yorta Yorta man on his father's side, and a descendant of First Fleet convicts via his mother. An educator and artist, he takes great joy in sharing knowledge with visitors to Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre.

On Sunday May 26, Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre partnered with Connecting Home to host an event for National Sorry Day. A time for reflection and healing, National Sorry Day pays tribute to the courage and vitality of the many Aboriginal people affected by past policies of forced removal. The day also serves to highlight the work that organisations such as Connecting Home are doing in the service of members of the Stolen Generations, and those similarly affected.

group of people Crowd at the Sorry Day event
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria

The afternoon kicked off with Bunjilaka’s Birrarung gallery being filled by the sounds of William Wandin-Dow’s didgeridoo, followed soon thereafter by a large and attentive crowd, who via MC Bryan Andy were given an appreciation for the significance of Sorry Day.

dancers Seven Sisters dance group
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria

A welcome to Country was performed by Kulin Nation elders Aunty Carolyn Briggs (Boon Wurrung), and Aunty Di Kerr (Woi Wurrung). They spoke of the day and its personal significance to each of them before a warm round of applause and the entrance to the gallery of the Seven Sisters dance troupe, who wowed the crowd with a tightly choreographed and evocative performance.

woman Alice Solomon
Image: John Patten
Source: Museum Victoria

The two key speakers for the afternoon then took their turns to speak to the crowd. The first to share her story was Zoe Upton, followed then by Alice Solomon. Both speakers were moving in what they had to say, and their heartfelt words remained in the crowd’s consciousness during the final performance of the afternoon, a clutch of songs sung beautifully and with great humour by the Koorie Skin Choir. 

Links:

Connecting Home

Reconciliation Australia

Recognise

MV Blog: National Sorry Day

MV Blog: Reconciliation Week 2012

About this blog

Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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