Exhibitions

DISPLAYING POSTS FILED UNDER: Exhibitions (104)

Exhibitions

Come and see the real thing! Exhibitions at Melbourne Museum, Immigration Museum, Scienceworks and beyond.

Dino Might

Author
by Wayne
Publish date
24 September 2013
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Comments (3)

In the late 1970’s and early 80’s, I was absolutely mad for dinosaurs. Many hours were spent poring over my small stash of dinosaur books - I used to lie on our worn lounge room carpet, gawping at fantastical images of a vengeful Triceratops skewering a clearly outraged Tyrannosaurus in the thigh. To my young eyes, the image was evocative and powerful, albeit a little coy in the lack of blood.

By today’s standards, the picture is quite out-dated in the postures of the protagonists, but it was enough to get me hooked on these intriguing (and like me, clearly ill-tempered) animals. My chief interests wavered over the following teenage years – at times Dinosaur Jr. were more interesting than dinosaurs - but dinos were always there in one way or another, bubbling away as a topic of interest in the back of my mind.

Qantassaurus Melbourne Museum's animatronic reconstructions of the Victorian dinosaur Qantassaurus
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Fast forward to today, and much has changed – my son sees CGI footage of dinosaurs that are so plausible that there’s genuine confusion over what is actually real. To his generation, it will likely seem ludicrous that our generation thought of Velociraptor as anything other than fully feathered, but to those of us of the “Jurassic Park” generation, the leathery-skinned versions will be long remembered. Disappointingly, it seems that despite scientific consensus on their feathers, the upcoming Jurassic Park film will feature the old-school, oversized, nude ‘raptors. But I digress...

Velociraptor skull A model of the skull of Velociraptor - feathers not shown....just like in Jurassic Park (I might need to get over this)
Image: John Broomfield
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Unlike Hollywood, the scientific world’s understanding of dinosaur behaviour, posture and lifestyles has changed over the years. There are numerous examples of dinosaur displays in Museums that required modification to keep them up-to-date with current research. One of the quirks of palaeontology - the active study of long-since-inactive animals - is that we can never really ‘get it right...finally’; the most we can hope for is to ‘get it right...for now’. New discoveries drive new interpretations, leading to new theories; forever edging us closer to the truth, but the goalposts are constantly moving.  With dinosaurs, you can never ‘know’ everything - and I find that quite reassuring.

Making of the First Peoples ad

Author
by Jareen
Publish date
11 September 2013
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One cold August morning at 5am, a team of us were outside along Birrarung Marr ‘on set’ shooting a commercial for the new First Peoples exhibition. Here are just a few behind the scenes photos of the shoot.

Aunty Fay Carter and Dharna on set. "... Hear our stories, know the joy in our hearts..." Aunty Fay Carter and Dharna on set.
Image: Matthew McCarthy
Source: Clear Design
 

Everyone on set. Final touch up before we begin shooting. Aunty Fay Carter (slightly hidden), Uncle Jack Charles, Dharna Nicholson-Bux and Marbee Williams with the make up artist.
Image: Matthew McCarthy
Source: Clear Design

Marbee and Uncle Jack Charles on set Marbee Williams and Uncle Jack Charles on set with the Melbourne skyline in the background.
Image: Matthew McCarthy
Source: Clear Design
 

The advertising for the First Peoples exhibition is centred around the word Wominjeka. The word means welcome in the local Koorie languages for Melbourne, Boonwurrung and Woi wurrung. You can find out about Victorian Aboriginal languages in the exhibition or our online map.

In the campaign, we feature four Victorian Aboriginal people: Aunty Fay Carter (Yorta Yorta and Dja Dja Wurrung), Uncle Jack Charles (Boonwurrung and Wiradjeri), Marbee Williams (Boonwurrung and Wiradjuri) and Dharna Nicholson-Bux (Wurundjeri and Yorta Yorta).

Dharna with Aunty Fay Dharna with Aunty Fay onset during the First Peoples commercial shoot at Birrarung Marr. August 2013.
Image: Scottie Cameron
Source: Museum Victoria

Uncle Jack Charles Uncle Jack Charles onset during the First Peoples commercial shoot.
Image: Scottie Cameron
Source: Museum Victoria

Marbee Williams. Marbee Williams onset for the First Peoples commercial shoot.
Image: Scottie Cameron
Source: Museum Victoria.
 

If you live in Melbourne, hopefully you will have started seeing the word Wominjeka around town. If you see our posters, ads, brochures, flags or video, snap a photo and use #wominjeka if you're sharing it on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. We'd love to see it!

Example of advertising for First Peoples. Examples of the advertising featuring Marbee Williams and Dharna Nicholson-Bux.
Image: Clear Design
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The campaign development was highly collaborative, taking inspiration from the First Peoples Yulendj (knowledge) Group of Elders and representatives of Aboriginal communities from across Victoria, the First Peoples exhibition and Bunjilaka teams, and taking into consideration the feedback from recent focus group sessions with non-Aboriginal museum visitors.

Huge thanks to everyone who has helped with the development of the campaign!

 

Guide to Victorian butterflies

Author
by Simon
Publish date
10 September 2013
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Dr Ross Field, a former head of Sciences at Museum Victoria, has compiled a spectacular book on one of his passions: butterflies of Victoria. Butterflies: Identification and life history is the result of many years of painstaking work on Ross’s part and covers all aspects of the lifecycle of these eternally popular insects.

Egg Tailed Emperor Butterfly Lateral view of the Tailed Emperor Butterfly egg
Image: Simon Hinkley & Ken Walker
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Incredible images take readers through the lifecycle of each species from egg, through caterpillar and the food plant it eats, pupa and finally adult. The magnified images of the eggs are stunning and allow us to view and admire objects usually too small to notice. The eggs can be ornamented, ribbed, round or cigar shaped and come in a range of colours. Depending on the viewer some people see a range of jellies or blancmanges when they look at some of these images, (or maybe that’s just me). In fact a selection of these egg shots is touring selected Victorian cultural venues as part of The Art of Science exhibition.

  Caterpillar larva Tailed Emperor Caterpillar of the Tailed Emperor Butterfly
Image: Ross Field
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Collecting the eggs of numerous species for photographing was a big undertaking; Ross has spent many hours in a host of locations watching butterflies circle until they land to lay their eggs. A sample of the eggs were collected and brought back to Melbourne Museum to be photographed using our camera/microscope set up. Prior to this book, anyone other than an expert who collected an egg would have to wait until the egg hatched and the caterpillar had reached one of its later instars before being able to hazard a guess at the species. With this new guide, the ability for the general public to undertake identifications in the field is greatly expanded.    

Pupa Tailed Emperor Pupa of the Tailed Emperor Butterfly
Image: Ross Field
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The egg images might also raise questions such as why do butterflies from the Pieridae family tend to lay cigar shaped eggs? Why do the eggs of some species have a series of lateral ribs running around the surface? Is there an evolutionary advantage to laying sculptured eggs? In short, this comprehensive field guide gives a new vision into the fascinating world of Victorian butterflies and helps to educate and provoke our interest into further research and conservation. 

Adult Tailed Emperor butterfly Adult Tailed Emperor Butterfly
Image: Ross Field
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Links:

Butterflies: Identification and life history. A Museum Victoria field guide by Ross Field. Available in paperback from MV shops or as an eBook from  iTunes or Booktopia.

Melbourne Zoo: 10 steps to a butterfly garden

Bunjil's wings

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
9 August 2013
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Outside, you see the vast nest - a thick tangle of branches and feathers - of Bunjil, Kulin creator being and Wedge-tailed Eagle. Within the nest hangs a marvellous kinetic sculpture that represents Bunjil’s wings, the sinuous curves of the Country he created, and the cycle of creation itself. As it moves and glows, Koorie Elders speak of Bunjil singing the Country, Law and people of the Kulin nation into being.

In this video, members of the First Peoples team talk about the Creation Cinema and Bunjil's Nest, and show you a preview of Bunjil's wings in flight.

 

Bunjil’s Nest and the Creation Cinema were developed under the guidance of the First Peoples Yulendj Group and are a creative collaboration between Glenn Romanis (Wedge-tailed Eagle feathers), Synthesis Design + Build (Bunjil’s Nest), ENESS (concept, design, vision and sound for Bunjil’s wings) and Melbourne Museum (overall concept and design).

First Peoples opens to the public on Saturday 7 September 2013 with an all-day festival celebrating Koorie culture.

The art of the bowerbird

Author
by Patrick
Publish date
17 July 2013
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You might spy an unusual new installation in the Forest Gallery as part of The Red Queen exhibition showing at MONA, the Museum of New and Old Art in Tasmania. The installation by English artist Toby Ziegler, entitled My vegetable love; Cultural exchange, is in the shape of a Utah teapot fashioned from the same material used by male Satin Bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus) to make their bowers.

Bowerbird with blue objects Jack, the older male bowerbird, interacting with the teapot bower.
Image: Jon Augier / Toby Ziegler
Source: Museum Victoria and MONA
 

The theme of My Vegetable Love is the interaction between the natural world (the Forest Gallery’s bowerbirds) and the artificial world (a computer-generated teapot), with the object itself being a hybrid between the two. The main theme of The Red Queen is ‘Why do human beings make art?’, and this component investigates natural animal behaviours that appear, to us, artistic.

Two juvenile bowerbirds Juvenile bowerbirds are also intrigued by Toby Ziegler's teapot.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

It references a 3D mathematical model of a teapot created in 1975 at the University of Utah which has become a standard reference object in computer-generated imaging (CGI), and also as a regular in-joke in animated Hollywood movies. It appears somewhere in all Pixar movies and in the ‘Third Dimension’ episode of The Simpsons.

Utah teapot A modern render of the original CGI teapot created at the University of Utah by Martin Newell.
Image: Dhatfield
Source:  CC BY-SA 3.0
 

Juvenile and female Satin Bowerbirds are olive green, but males turn a deep blue upon maturity at about seven years of age. Jack, the oldest male Bowerbird, has lived in the Forest Gallery as an adult for 13 years. Errol turned completely blue earlier this year, after more than 12 months in transition from his juvenile plumage.

Errol the Satin Bowerbird Errol during his transformation from juvenile to adult plumage. His unusual patterning prompted many queries from puzzled visitors.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria
 

A new webcam streams live video of activity around the teapot into MONA and our website. One of Jack’s old bowers is also takes pride of place in the gallery at MONA. The teapot will remain in the Forest Gallery as part of the exhibition until 21 April 2014.

 

 

You'll need Windows Media Player to view this video feed. Get Media Player

Links:

MONA

Bowerbird Cam

'Birds face off for balance of bower in exhibit' in The Age, 19 Jun 2013

Installing Many Nations

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
11 July 2013
Comments
Comments (1)

The mammoth task of installing over 480 beautiful, rich and significant objects into the Many Nations section of First Peoples has begun. Early this week the very first item – a substantial wooden carving of Bunjil by Mick Harding – went in to its final position as the crowning object of the Animal Creations showcase.

Man installing a sculpture Anthony Abell with the carving of Bunjil by Mick Harding.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Deb Frost is leading the team of exhibition collection managers carefully placing the objects into the Many Nations display. Explains Deb, "the complexity of these cases is that nearly every object requires a custom support, or mount, designed specifically for that object." Mount-makers from Pod Museum and Art Services have spent recent months making fine, precise metal frames that will show each object at its best, while holding them securely in place. Deb points out that the mount holding Bunjil up high is much beefier than most of the others since "that object alone is 16.5 kilograms and so that mount is specifically designed to take that weight."

John and Ant installing Many Nations display John Duggan and Anthony Abell placing the Bunjil sculpture into its showcase.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

When filled, the showcases will house a stunning array of historical and contemporary objects made by Aboriginal people from all over Australia. Senior Curator Rosemary Wrench looked at over 16,000 historical objects from the museum's collection, selecting ones that have never been on display, while new acquisitions and commissions show continuing and new expressions of culture. Senior Designer Corinne Balaam created a beautiful light filled display to highlight each piece within six cases: Animal Creations, Celebrating Culture, Marking Identity, Keeping Places, Toy Stories and Working Country.

Deb has been working with these objects for many months and has come to know them very well. And which is her favourite? "How do you pick one? They're all amazing," she says. "Bunjil was a treat because that was a commissioned work, but my favourite is in Toy Stories, and that's the doll with the feeding breasts. That's my number one object because I think it's got a wonderful story." This doll will be held in a special mount cast from the hands of Myee Patten. "The childhood stories, that's my soft spot," continues Deb. "All the Elders coming in and speaking about those times - it's wonderful to hear those stores from their childhood some sixty or more years ago, and hearing their memories of learning from their grandparents and Elders."

Deb Frost with drill Deb with the drill rig her team used to drill hundred of precise holes for the custom object mounts in Many Nations.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

As for a favourite showcase, Deb explains, "many of our team love Celebrating Culture because it's all about body adornment, the bracelets and necklaces, which are magnificent, however I love the Marking Identity case with shields that show the colouration and different patterns from state to state. This case packs a punch. It says to me, look how diverse our Indigenous communities are around Australia. The baskets in Keeping Places are gorgeous too; I love the different weaves, the different colours and different types, from the honeypot through to the ceremonial bowl made by Will Patten. It's great to see the new with the old."

Empty showcase The Marking Identity showcase awaiting installation of the shields from around Australia.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

As the crew finalises the installation, their concerns are protecting the precious objects and managing the logistics. "The tricky bits are the technical aspects like accessing the cases, ensuring the stability of mounts, keeping everything clean and free of dust."

"You address all the conservation and collection management needs for those objects and in the end, once they're finally locked away safely in their showcase and on display for the world to see, then everyone's tickled! That's the highlight of our work."

First Peoples opens at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum on 7 September 2013.

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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