Melbourne Museum

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Melbourne Museum

Melbourne Museum explores life in Victoria, from our natural environment to our culture and history. Located in Carlton Gardens, the building houses a permanent collection in eight galleries, including one just for children.

MV's new digital exhibits

Author
by Nicole K
Publish date
5 March 2015
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On Tuesday 3 March, Museum Victoria joined 25 Australian cultural institutions at Parliament House to launch the Australian component of the Google Cultural Institute.

Google Cultural Institute launch, 3 March 2015, Parliament House, Canberra Google Cultural Institute launch, 3 March 2015, Parliament House, Canberra
Image: Nicole Kearney
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The Google Cultural Institute is an online collection of millions of cultural treasures from over 670 museums, art galleries and archives around the world. Visitors can explore millions of artworks and artefacts in extraordinary detail, create their own galleries and share their favourite works.

Museum Victoria has been involved in the Google Art project since 2011 and was among the first institutions to partner with Google to create what is now the world's largest online museum.

Featured content on the Google Cultural Institute Featured content on the Google Cultural Institute
Source: Google
 

Tuesday's launch welcomed 14 new Australian contributors, including the Australian War Memorial, the National Portrait Gallery and the Australian Centre for the Moving Image. Over 2000 of Australia's finest cultural works are now accessible online.

Among these treasures are 226 highlights from Museum Victoria's collection. These include Aboriginal bark paintings, photographs depicting early Victorian history, and scientific illustrations that trace the development of scientific art.

In order to tell the fascinating stories behind these collection items, we have created three digital exhibitions within the Google Cultural Institute:

The Art of Science: from Rumphius to Gould (1700-1850)

The Art of Science exhibit The Art of Science exhibit
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Scientific Art in Victoria (1850-1900)

Scientific Art in Victoria exhibit Scientific Art in Victoria exhibit
Source: Museum Victoria
 

A.J. Campbell (1880-1930)

A.J. Campbell exhibit A.J. Campbell exhibit
Source: Museum Victoria
 

These exhibits include stunning photographs and illustrations, curator-narrated videos and in-depth information.

Many of these illustrations come from rare books preserved in our library and, in many cases, accompany the first published descriptions of our unique Australian fauna. The books are available online in their entirety in the Biodiversity Heritage Library, a project funded in Australia by the Atlas of Living Australia.

Love is in the air

Author
by Blaire Dobiecki
Publish date
2 February 2015
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Blaire is a Presenter at Melbourne Museum and self-professed dog enthusiast. She specialises in having fun and doing science, often simultaneously.

My opening question when presenting education programs to eager students is 'what’s the best thing you’ve seen today?' The range of answers always astounds me. From the Mamenchisaurus to the Marn Grook, sometimes kids name things that I didn’t even know we had. 

Museum love letter from Tui A love letter from visitor Tui reads 'Dear Dinosaurs, I love your big bones and srong teeth. You are soooo cool. Love Tui'
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Inspired by their answers, I’ve helped develop a weekend program called Museum Love Letters. From 31 January to 22 March, we invite everyone and anyone to write a love letter to their favourite museum object.

Museum love letter from Christine Love letter from Christine reads 'Dear pretty, groovy Luna Park roller coaster carriage, You make me happy just by still existing! Christine xo'
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Perhaps you’d like to tell Phar Lap that you remember visiting him as a child? Maybe you find the Federation Tapestry particularly touching? Is it time to tell the crystalline gypsum how beautiful it is? Now’s your chance!

Visit Melbourne Museum on a weekend to write your message on heart-shaped cards and post them in our special love letter mailbox. Otherwise, post your letter to:

Museum Love Letters
Melbourne Museum
GPO Box 666
Melbourne VIC 3001

Outpourings of love from staff are already rolling in. Here’s part of the letter from Caz in our Humanities department, to Phar Lap:

Love letter to Phar Lap Caz's letter reads, 'I remember the time I walked past your glass stable in the old Swanston Walk Museum, to discover that an anonymous fan had left you some crepe paper carrots on your birthday. Now that is true love!'
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Megan, one of our volunteers, has written to an entire exhibition!

Love letter to Bugs Alive Megan's Ode to Bugs Alive! reads, 'Oh Bugs Alive! I love you so, with your shiny wings + feet. With your hairy, shedding carapaces, you're a creepy, knobbly treat.'
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We will be keeping track of which objects receive letters of love and we’ll update you with the results throughout the program. Don’t forget to share your love letters with us on social media using the hashtag #MelbourneMuseum.

We look forward to reading your letters. There are rumours that the objects themselves may write back! 

The bountiful Mallee

Author
by Patrick
Publish date
17 December 2014
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In Bugs Alive! you can see almost 50 displays of live invertebrates. Most of them from either tropical or arid parts of Australia, illustrating the adaptations needed for living in extreme environments.

Blue butterfly and bee fly resting on grass stems Sleeping beauties, clothed in condensation in the early hours of the morning. | Left: Common Grass Blue (Zizina labradus) Right: A bee fly (Family Bombyliidae)
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

So each year, when the weather conditions are right, we head out to the Mallee to boost our stocks of insects and spiders. The best time to visit is on a hot, humid night—which happened last week—just before or just after a thunderstorm. Like most desert species, Mallee insects wait months for the rain and then emerge from the spinifex in their thousands.

Two people in arid landscape Chloe Miller and Maik Fiedel searching through typical Mallee habitat.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

At night the desert resonates with the songs of katydids, the loudest of which come from Robust Fan-winged Katydids (Psacadonotus robustus). Unfortunately the fat abdomen of this dun-coloured species is often host to the larvae of tachinid flies (family Tachinidae). These parasites feed on the internal organs before emerging from the katydid which dies soon afterwards.

Brown katydid grasshopper A male Robust Fan-winged Katydid (Psacadonotus robustus).
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Most katydid species are surprisingly colourful, sporting bright greens, blues and reds.

Three katydid grasshoppers Left: Female Striped Polichne (Polichne argentata); Centre: The undescribed ‘Mystery Hump-backed Katydid’ (Elephantodea species); Right: The unfortunately-named Victorian Sluggish Katydid (Hemisaga lanceolata).
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

One of our prime targets is Mitchell’s Cockroach (Polyzosteria mitchelli) which we breed at Melbourne Museum off-display, perhaps the most beautiful cockroach in Australia. With its golden markings and eggshell-blue legs, this species is one of more than 500 native cockroaches that are rarely seen by the average Australian but which are extremely important in native ecosystems. They shouldn’t be confused with the five or so introduced cockroach species that infest our houses–native cockroaches are happy in the bush and almost never come inside.

colourful cockroach A female Mitchell’s Cockroach (Polyzosteria mitchelli)
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The desert seems to wake up after a rainstorm, with unexpected species such as snails and damselflies making an appearance.

Damselfly and group of snails Left: A female Metallic Ringtail damselfly (Austrolestes cingulatus). Right: Tiny desert snails (Microxeromagma lowei) living under bark.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria

Wolf spiders are the dominant ground species, their emerald eyes shining in the torchlight. This male wolf spider (below) was seen halfway down a burrow and was difficult to distract until we discovered the source of his interest—a large female wolf spider at the bottom of the burrow.

Wolf spider and burrow Left: A male wolf spider (LycosaRight: Close-up of the male.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The Little Desert, Big Desert, Sunset Country and Hattah-Kulkyne each have their own distinct habitats and faunas, just a few hours’ drive from Melbourne.

Landscape with blue sky The endless sky and flat horizon of the Mallee region.
Image: Patrick Honan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Dinorama ready for summer

Author
by Adrienne Leith
Publish date
12 December 2014
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Museum Victoria’s Senior Palaeontologist, Dr Tom Rich, says ‘most people don’t realise that Victoria looked completely different 120 million years ago. If you wanted to you could walk all the way to Antarctica. The vegetation was lush and green. During the winter, it was dark all day. This was the world of the polar dinosaurs that once roamed Victoria.’

It's a world that we're recreating in miniature through our Dinorama – a diorama of the rift valley in southeastern Australia during the Cretaceous period. Our preparators drew from the work of the museum’s palaeontologists and key artists, such as Dr Rich and Peter Trusler, to model the ancient landscape from styrofoam.

Two men in workshop Preparators Kim Haines and Brendon Taylor survey and discuss their progress on the Dinorama.
Image: Adrienne Leith
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Man building a diorama in a workshop Kim Haines sanding the waterways of the diorama.
Image: Adrienne Leith
Source: Museum Victoria

Man painting diorama in workshop Brendon Taylor putting the final touches on the diorama.
Image: Adrienne Leith
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The preps sanded and painted the diorama to create the detailed waterways of the valley. Preparator Brendon Taylor also painted a backboard to show the sky and give the diorama depth.

Apart from adding the last touches of some vegetation, the diorama is now ready for the foyer in anticipation of our summer holiday program. Come to Melbourne Museum in the summer holidays to help populate the Dinorama with miniature animals from the period. 

The Dinorama activity will run daily from 11am to 3pm from 26 December to 27 January.

Links:

MV Blog: Dinosaur diorama

School Holiday activities at Melbourne Museum

Farewell Stella

Author
by Priscilla Gaff
Publish date
9 December 2014
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Priscilla is a Program Coordinator for Life Sciences and works on education programs at Melbourne Museum.

Stella Young and I both started working at the museum in the same week, back in 2007. I’d come from a small team of five to the large beast that is ‘the museum’, and I was thrilled to make a new best buddy in week one.

Stella Young Stella in the museum office, showcasing her stylish new glasses, 2009.
Image: Murphy Peoples
Source: Murphy Peoples
 

We instantly knew we were one anothers' people. We bonded over our excitement to be working at the museum, and over our love of working with the children, families, and schools who visited. We’d both studied education at uni, and loved debriefing and deconstructing our interactions with the students – and in particular about the funny things the children would say. But my story of friendship with Stella isn’t unique; it wasn’t long before everyone in the museum knew her too. Her charm, her wit, her style, her intelligence and her warmth, not to mention her ‘naughty knits’ for sale at the Christmas Staff Market, drew us all into her. And we all loved working with her.

Stella Young at craft stall Stella Young with her naughty knits hidden behind the red curtain, museum staff Christmas craft market, 2009.
Image: Murphy Peoples
Source: Murphy Peoples
 

Stella – you were a dear friend to us all. You challenged us, changed us, you left the museum a better place. We missed you when you left us for the ABC, but you stayed in touch, and we knew that your new job gave you an amazing platform for your passion and talents.

Three performers Museum Comedy tour guides Ben MacKenzie, Kate McLennnan and Stella Young, 2011.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We never stopped thinking of you as one of us, and we shall miss you terribly.

Before joining the ABC, Stella was based at Melbourne Museum where she was a Programs Officer for over three years. During her time at the museum Stella was a fantastic communicator, terrific work colleague, passionate educator and a great friend to many current and former staff members. We send our profound condolences to her family and friends.

Dinosaur diorama

Author
by Adrienne Leith
Publish date
18 November 2014
Comments
Comments (1)

Adrienne creates and presents public programs at Melbourne Museum.

Imagine a Victorian Cretaceous rift valley complete with river bed, trees and a suite of prehistoric animals. Now imagine it recreated in miniature in a classic museum diorama: the DINORAMA!

Displayed in front of the Forest Gallery, the Dinorama will be the feature activity of our summer school holidays at Melbourne Museum. We're inviting visitors to make thousands of Cretaceous animals to fill the little landscape with life.

model of dinosaur Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei was a horned dinosaur, fossils of which were found at Kilcunda. Kim Haines made this tiny version.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

In consultation with our palaeontologists, our preparators made miniatures of three animals—Koolasuchus cleelandi, Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei and Qantassaurus intrepidus—that lived in Victoria approximately 120 million years ago. From the models, the preparators make moulds…. and from the moulds, summer visitors can create thousands of little beasts from modelling clay.

model of dinosaur Michael Pennell's model of Koolasuchus cleelandi, a three-metre-long predator that lived in and around fast-flowing cold streams. Fossils of Koolasuchus were were found on the coast of Victoria just east of Phillip Island.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Every couple of days we'll bring out a new colour of clay until we have a Dinorama filled with multi-coloured ancient animals. Our school holiday activities start on 26 December, so keep an eye on the Melbourne Museum foyer after then.

modelling a dinosaur Inverloch was the discovery site of Qantassurus intrepidus, a small herbivorous hypsilophodontid with large eyes for foraging in long polar winters. Brendon Taylor created this model. You can see an animatronic Qantassaurus in the 600 Million Years exhibition.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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