Scienceworks

DISPLAYING POSTS FILED UNDER: Scienceworks (76)

Scienceworks

Scienceworks makes science an adventure. Located in Spotswood (7km from the Melbourne CBD), you can discover everyday science through interactive exhibits, programs and shows at this award-winning, interactive museum. 

Filming our underwater backyard

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
23 October 2014
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What do you know of the Vampire Squid? How about the Dragonfish, the Sea Mouse and the Fangtooth? These bizarre animals live kilometres – yes, kilometres – beneath the ocean’s surface. We’ve brought them up to sea level for you to meet at the exhibition Deep Oceans, which opens this weekend at Scienceworks.

Anglerfish exhibit Deep Oceans Anglerfish exhibit
Image: Australian Museum
Source: Australian Museum
 

This exhibition comes to us from the Australian Museum and we’ve added some local characters to the mix. Parks Victoria tells us that nearly half of Port Phillip is less than eight metres deep, and its greatest depth is only 24 metres. It’s just a puddle compared to the true deep oceans. This means we can see a huge diversity of our marine life just by heading out into the bay with a mask and snorkel.

 

Over the past months, Dr Julian Finn has filmed seals, fish, crabs and others in our local marine parks with a fish-eye lens. This footage will be projected inside the Underwater Backyard virtual aquarium dome, where you can stand right beside the bay’s residents without getting wet.

Deep Oceans is at Scienceworks 25 October 2014 to 12 April 2015.

Steaming through Williamstown

Author
by Matilda Vaughan
Publish date
3 October 2014
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Matilda swapped a life working as an engineer for a life curating the museum’s historical Engineering collection. She’s very curious about how stuff works, how it’s made and why. If a machine’s got a switch, she’ll definitely flick it.

A very satisfying part of my job is participating in the Scienceworks Working Machines program. How else would I find myself steaming down the main street of Williamstown in a historic steam truck a couple of Sunday mornings ago?

View from inside the truck Entering Nelson Place in a historic steam truck from The Strand, Williamstown.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

A small and dedicated team of staff and volunteers help demonstrate some of our heritage vehicles to the public on four selected Sundays a year – Machines in Action Days. On four other Sundays we are busy learning and practising the skills needed to safely operate such historic machinery. I spent the first couple of hours in the morning bringing our Cowley Traction Engine up to steam ready for the team, and then it was time for some training by Richard on the Super Sentinel Steam Waggon (circa 1924).

Richard inside the truck Heritage machinery program volunteer, Richard Hayes, behind the wheel of the Super Sentinel Steam Waggon.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Our heritage vehicles have special permits so they can travel on public roads. So on some days, instead of practising around our arena, we get to survey the streets of Spotswood and Williamstown from behind the wheel of one of our steam-driven engines.

Man on vintage bike Sharing the road with another piece of vintage machinery.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

So what skill did I practise during that trip? Well, it was basically shovelling the coal into the firebox of the boiler to maintain the correct pressure to suit Richard’s travel speed and load. And make sure the water to the boiler was kept topped up. Sometimes I had time to wave to people in the streets, those enjoying their breakfasts, and even snap a few pictures. But not many – I had too much coal to shovel.

Tower and car park in Williamstown Sentinel in the car park behind the Williamstown Timeball Tower.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

We got as far as the historic Williamstown Timeball Tower before it was thought best to head back to Scienceworks, before we ran out of coal. No handy coal depots nearby any more.

Finding the Orchard Pacemaker

Author
by Matilda Vaughan
Publish date
29 September 2014
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Matilda swapped a life working as an engineer for a life curating the museum’s historical Engineering collection. She’s very curious about how stuff works, how it’s made and why. If a machine’s got a switch, she’ll definitely flick it.

A recent Discovery Centre enquirer asked whether there were any images of a Sunshine Massey Harris tractor in a particular trade literature document in our collection. Unfortunately that document did not have the picture she was hoping for. But, as we have such an extensive holding of Sunshine Massey Harris material, I was convinced that there must be a picture of this tractor somewhere amongst it all. So armed with her photo of the tractor’s radiator only, the hunt was on.

detail of tractor Photo of the Sunshine Massey Harris tractor sent in by the enquirer.  

I started with the Price Books. They are not just lists of numbers and descriptions; they often have small illustrations or photos of the product. From these I was able to see, based on the shape and features of the radiator, that the particular tractor was the Orchard Pacemaker model. But the images were too small to make out the feature she was most interested in – the 'SUNSHINE MASSEY HARRIS' impression on the radiator. The Price Books did however reveal that these tractors seemed to have only been available between 1940 and 1942. 

Tractor catalogue An image of the Orchard Pacemaker (bottom line, middle) among other tractors in the Sunshine Massey Harris Price Book.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria Trade Literature Collection TL41010
 

After more searching, I finally found a photograph in a general publicity brochure for tractors (dated 1941) of the Orchard Pacemaker, clearly showing the radiator.

tractor brochure The Sunshine Massey Harris Orchard Pacemaker in a publicity brochure for Sunshine Massey Harris Tractors, W.A., 1941.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria Trade Literature Collection TL45120
 

detail of tractor Detail of the radiator of the Orchard Pacemaker.
Image: Matilda Vaughan
Source: Museum Victoria
 

It was not an easy search and most times these types of searches turn up nothing. So it makes these little finds all the more special and it’s immensely satisfying to be able to provide more information to the public. 

Links:

Trade Literature Collection

Publicity Brochure - H.V. McKay Massey Harris Pty Ltd Tractors 1941

National Science Week - Meet the Scientists

Author
by Priscilla
Publish date
30 July 2014
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Priscilla is a Program Coordinator for Life Sciences and works on education programs at Melbourne Museum.

In National Science Week this year, we're running a special program called Meet the Scientists just for students in Years 9 and 10.

If you're a teacher, you can book your Year 9 or 10 classes in to chat with our researchers about their day jobs. And if you're not, here's a taste of what the students will get: interviews with scientists who work on our natural history collections.

Meet Mel Mackenzie, Collection Manager of Marine Invertebrates

From scallops to squids, crabs to octopuses, Mel’s day job sounds more like she works in a restaurant than a museum. That is until she gets into the nudibranchs, echinoderms, flatworms, sponges, isopods and jellyfishes – just to name a few. Meet Mel Mackenzie.

Mel looking down microscope Mel Mackenzie, Collection Manager of Marine Invertebrates, on an Antarctic research trip.
Image: Pete Lens (BAS)
Source: Museum Victoria
 

How did you get into being a Collection Manager?

I started working at the museum as a volunteer docent in 1994, educating public visitors in various marine exhibitions while studying Zoology at Melbourne University. From there I moved down to the dungeons of the previous location of the museum on Russell Street as a volunteer research assistant to Dr. C.C. Lu, busily counting squid suckers and tentacles to assist in descriptions of new species. I went on to work as a Relocations Officer during the Museum move from Russell Street, then as an assistant collection manager in Invertebrate Zoology at various temporary locations before finally settling at Melbourne Museum.

After a ten-year stint away (in Learning, Development, Training and Publishing both here and in Japan) I’ve now been back working in the collections at Melbourne Museum since 2010.

Which collections do you look after?

The Marine Invertebrate Collection, though we do also have some freshwater invertebrates (like crayfish) and also some land snails and slugs. The collection is a specimen 'library' of everything from tiny tanaids (a type of crustacean) to giant squids. We keep the collection organised, viable and accessible for ongoing morphological, genetic, and environmental research. 

Have you got a favourite marine invertebrate?

Holothurians; more commonly known as Sea Cucumbers. Apart from my usual collection management responsibilities, I get to work closely with other scientists on this group of animals and contribute through fieldwork, lab work, research and photography to a variety of scientific projects and publications. I’ve been lucky enough to have travelled to Poland, the Falklands and even the Weddell Sea in Antarctica to collect and identify these curious critters.

 

Meet Dr Erich Fitzgerald, Senior Curator of Palaeontology

When you’re studying the past, life came in many more forms than just the dinosaurs. Palaeontologists study fossil birds, plants, snakes, insects, or even pollen, which all help us to build up a picture of the past. Meet Dr Erich Fitzgerald.

Erich with whale skull Dr Erich Fitzgerald, with the fossil skull of the early whale Janjucetus hunderi.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria
 

What area of palaeontology do you specialise in?

I investigate the evolutionary history of aquatic vertebrates, especially marine mammals such as whales, seals and sea cows. This research involves exploring the fossil record as well as investigating aquatic adaptations of living species. I seek to document the diversity, evolutionary relationships and palaeobiology of marine vertebrates through time and uncover the drivers of their evolution and extinction.

How did you get your job?

I studied earth science and zoology as part of a Bachelors of Science at Melbourne University, and then studied fossil whales for my PhD at Monash University. I was then a Smithsonian Institution Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, and more recently was the Harold Mitchell Fellow at Museum Victoria (2009–2012) before getting my job as the Senior Curator.

What are you researching now?

My major ongoing program of research involves the documentation and analysis of the little-studied fossil record of marine mammals in Australia, exploring how and when the remarkable biological adaptations of today’s whales, dolphins and seals evolved. I am interested in the questions opened up by looking at extinct and living marine mammals as a continuum: to understand the present we must grasp the past. That’s what Wallace and Darwin showed us: life only makes sense in light of its evolution.

Links:

Meet the Scientists program

National Science Week

Meet the Rescuers!

Author
by Murray
Publish date
23 July 2014
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Murray is a Programs Officer at Scienceworks.

Rescue: Live kicked off at Scienceworks on Saturday 12 July with the arrival of the High Angle Rescue Team of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade. More than 400 Scienceworks visitors braved the cold to witness the daring and skills of the MFB as they demonstrated how they can save people trapped on skyscrapers and cliff-faces with their special equipment, ropes and rigging.

Rescue Live Visitors to Scienceworks look on eagerly as the MFB High Angle Rescue Team specialists prepare for their demonstration.
Source: MFB

Rescue Live Meet the mannequin! Excited children speak with an MFB specialist about a mannequin dummy used in a mock rescue
Source: MFB

Rescue Live A crowd gathers to inspect how the MFB specialists can save people trapped on skyscrapers and cliff-faces with their special equipment, ropes and rigging.
Source: MFB

Rescue Live MFB specialists use their equipment to demonstrate to a gasping crowd how they can save people in trapped in precarious situations.
Source: MFB
 

The Rescue: Live program gives our visitors the chance to interact with members from several emergency response teams and see how they help keep Australians safe. The program also gives the organisations the opportunity to raise awareness of their services to the community, and is an action-packed accompaniment to our Rescue exhibition. On selected weekends until 14 September, come see safety specialists show their stuff in the arena, the amphitheatre or inside the Scienceworks building.

Rescue: Live program

Two eclipses for April

Author
by Tanya
Publish date
11 April 2014
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Not one, but two eclipses will occur this month and both are partially visible from Melbourne.

Just before sunset on the 15th April, the Moon will rise already totally eclipsed. It should look quite eerie to see a red moon rising above the eastern horizon and it's always amazing how bright the Moon appears as it moves out of the Earth's shadow and returns to its usual splendour. While you are watching the eclipse, be sure to take a look at Mars, which will be just to the left of the Moon and the bright star Spica (in the constellation of Virgo) that will be found just above.

Lunar Eclipse The progression of a total lunar eclipse in August 2007.
Image: Phil Hart
Source: http://www.philhart.com/
 

Two weeks later on the 29th April, the Moon and Sun will come together in the sky and we'll see a partial solar eclipse. The eclipse will begin during the afternoon and reach its maximum point just before sunset. At the height of the eclipse 64% of the Sun's diameter will be covered by the Moon. The Sun will still be partially eclipsed as it sets below the western horizon.

Solar Eclipse The Moon takes a bite out of the Sun.
Image: Phil Hart
Source: http://www.philhart.com/
 

The timings for both the lunar and solar eclipse can be found from the Planetarium's monthly newsletter – Skynotes – which is a great guide for finding your way around the night sky.

Importantly, lunar eclipses are lovely to watch and you don't need any special equipment. Solar eclipses, on the other hand, require a bit of care and planning. Never look directly at the Sun.

There are safe ways to watch a solar eclipse and the easiest is to purchase special eclipse glasses. They are available from the Scienceworks shop and will allow you to watch the event, while protecting your eyesight.

You can also create a simple "pinhole" projection. It's as easy as making a small pinhole in a piece of paper or cardboard. Do not look through the hole, but allow the Sun to shine through and project an image onto a second piece of cardboard. Even a blank wall or a clear patch of ground can make a good surface for projection.

And as I've mentioned previously on the Museum's blog, sometimes nature helps out too. If you can see sunlight travelling through the leaves of a tree, you’ve got yourself some ready-made pinhole projections. Check the ground and it might be covered with little crescent Sun images, just like this great example from the Astronomy magazine website.

About this blog

Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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