MV Blog

DISPLAYING POSTS FROM: Dec 2013 (5)

When Museum Victoria is not enough

Author
by Max
Publish date
24 December 2013
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Comments (3)

You come to the museum and ask; ‘Do you have any (insert hoped for item - cocoa tins, paper bags, vintage telephones, glass time capsules, etc) on display?’ To which we respond by explaining that, even though Museum Victoria has about 17 million or so objects in our collection, we only have a tiny fraction on display. This causes you great disappointment as you are one of those members of the public with specific interests and desires. You can view more at Collections Online, but you want to see the actual objects in the flesh don’t you? Well fear not, now you only need to visit Victorian Collections, a project developed in partnership by Museum Victoria and Museums Australia (Victoria)

 

SSW Shopping Bag Two brown paper bags which were available for free in SSW Supermarkets, so that customers could pack their grocery purchases to be able to take them home. The bags have SSW advertising printed on them in red, yellow, and navy blue inks.
Image: Sunshine and District Historical Society
Source: Sunshine and District Historical Society
 

Here you can search the database to discover your favourite things and where they might live. You like all things glass? Well, there are hundreds of items for your viewing pleasure, but the best of all if you click on the object it will tell you where you will find it. It could be beer glasses from Dixon's Hotel, now the Commonwealth Hotel in Orbost. You’ll find these at the Orbost and District Historical Society Inc. So jump on your bike and start peddling. Or how about a Glass vessel time capsule c1800's? Alfred Hospital Nursing Archives. Start walking - it’s around the corner.

 

Old Dutch Cocoa Tin Tin metal and tin top for cocoa with colour print and round internal lid. Caption of a woman drinking cocoa, red Australian flag and British flag on other faces. Top embossed "H". Marked - "Old Dutch Cocoa", "Net Weight 8 ozs," (Display side) "Manufactured by Hoadley's Chocolates Ltd, Australia.
Image: Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum
Source: Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum
 

Now you never have to go without, never have to say ‘Gee I wish they had more Hand Planes’ (nearly 1500 – check it out). All you need do is get online, go to Victorian Collections then set off for one of the many unique and varied museums that can be found dotted across the Victorian countryside. Enjoy!

 

Mobile Telephone handset, battery in carry case. The Future is here! Early mobile phone. Bought in 1990 this was the first type of mobile phone used in the field by ATCV.
Image: Conservation Volunteers
Source: Conservation Volunteers Corner University Drive & Enterprise Grove Mount Helen 3350
 

Burrowing bees

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
18 December 2013
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Comments (2)

No biologist worth their salt will stumble across a burrow in the ground without having a good stickybeak. And museum biologists are definitely worth their salt*.

So when the Alpine National Park Bioscan team found several hundred small burrows in one spot, they couldn't just wonder if they were made by crayfish or perhaps mole crickets. This hypothesis needed testing. Colin from Live Exhibits got to digging.

hut in the Alps Burrows in the foreground and Davies Plain Hut in the background.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

He stuck a blade of grass down the burrow and used a spoon to carefully dig around it. About 30 or 40 cm down he found, not a cray or cricket, but a little bee. It was no coincidence; a second excavation turned up another bee in the next burrow.

Colin digging holes Colin digging up burrows with a spoon.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

The bees belong to the subfamily Halictinae, which happens to be the speciality of museum entomologist and bioscan participant Dr Ken Walker. He collects most of his study specimens as they are out foraging and rarely sees the burrows. And he'd never seen burrows in such high density –about 400 in one small grassy area.

Ken explained that the bees belonging to the genus Lasioglossum and subgenus Parasphecodes. "Lasioglossum is one of the largest genera in Australia, doing most of the work of pollinating." These burrows are where the female bees brood the next generation.

Halictine bee The halictine bee responsible for the burrows.
Image: David Paul
Source: Museum Victoria
 

"They're a semi-social bee," said Ken. "In a single nest there can be six to ten females, which are all queens. They all lay their own eggs, and they all help excavate that main tunnel but each one of them then makes a lateral tunnel by themselves. At the end they build a group of cells each lined with saliva, and they put in a pollen ball mixed with a little bit of nectar, and they lay an egg and close the whole thing up."

But that's not the end of the story, because the bee larva isn't alone in the cell. Looking closely, Ken spotted a number of large mites on the backs of the bees. The mites are harmless to the bee since they're a non-feeding, migratory (or hypopial) life stage, waiting patiently for the bee to finish stocking the brood cell with pollen.

Halictine bee with mite The red arrow shows the location of a hitch-hiking mite on this bee.
Image: Ken Walker
Source: Museum Victoria

Mite on a bee Detail of a mite on the back of a bee.
Image: Ken Walker
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Said Ken, "just before the bee closes up the cell, she turns around and brushes one or two mites off, which then develop to the feeding and sexual stages." The mites act like little housekeepers, eating any mould or fungus that attacks the pollen ball and thus keeping it fresh for the developing bee. When the new adult bee is ready to emerge, the mites' own young clamber aboard and travel on to the next burrow. "It's a wonderful relationship there."

Halictine bee Dorsal view of the burrowing semi-social bee.
Image: David Paul
Source: Museum Victoria
 

So there you have it – nosy biologists reveal an underground community of fascinating little animals, and Parks Victoria rangers have an interesting reason to recommend that tents be pitched away from the field of muddy burrows.

*Humans contain about 0.4% salt by weight. So a 70kg museum biologist, say, contains about 280g salt**. That much table salt costs about a dollar from a supermarket. If instead we say they're worth their weight in gold, according to today's price, and the Dynamic Earth scale, that puts our 70kg biologist at $3,112,900. The real value is probably somewhere in the middle.

**Except marine biologists. They're a bit saltier.

Links:

ABC Bush Telegraph: Hive of activity reveals all in alpine bioscan

The Age: Critter census reaps bonanza for researchers

MV Blog: Alpine Bioscan

A Christmas star for 2013

Author
by Tanya
Publish date
13 December 2013
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Comments (2)

Just in time for Christmas, a new star has appeared in our southern sky!

Nova Centauri 2013 is the brightest nova to be seen since 1999. It is about as bright as the fifth star in the Southern Cross and is very easy to spot from Melbourne, and across Australia in general. It sits right next to Beta Centauri, one of the famous two pointer stars that leads the way to the Southern Cross.

Nova Cen 2013 from ESO This photograph was taken from La Silla Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert on the morning of 9 December 2013.
Image: Yuri Beletsky
Source: ESO
 

The nova appears just to the left of Beta Centauri, the bluer and higher of the two bright stars in the lower-right part of the image. The Southern Cross and the dark Coal Sack Nebula are also captured near the top of the image.

The nova was discovered on 2 December by John Seach from New South Wales. It is a 'classical nova' and is caused by a dead white dwarf star having a brief, but intense new-lease on life. White dwarfs are stellar embers, where nuclear fusion (the fire that keeps a star shining) has ended. However, this white dwarf has a close companion star. If enough gas from the companion falls onto the white dwarf it triggers a brief explosion on the star's surface.

The star undergoes an extreme burst of brightness. But unlike a supernova, the white dwarf remains intact and lives to tell the tale.

What better reason is there to slip away from the Christmas madness and spend a quiet moment or two, under the stars.

Links:

Ideas about the 'real' Christmas star from Phil Plait's Bad Astronomy blog

ESO Science Outreach Network - Australia

Preparing to Think Ahead

Author
by Alice
Publish date
5 December 2013
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Comments (2)

The whole preparation department have been hard at work over the past few months getting their creations ready for the opening of Scienceworks' new permanent exhibition, Think Ahead.

I went to visit the team during their last week of preparation to see some of their projects in the final stages of development.

Building model houses Building model houses
Image: Alice Gibbons
Source: Museum Victoria
 

What has always impressed me about all the clever individuals in the preparation department is that their job combines highly refined artistic skills with science and design....and a whole lot of patience and lateral thinking!   

The team’s recent body of work for Think Ahead is certainly a testament to their craft. Using a creative mix of materials ranging from state-of-the-art plastic technology to readymade dollhouse furniture, the team have created a wide range of objects and interactives for permanent display including plastic foods, futuristic human figurines, replica ice cores, miniature dioramas and life-sized human mannequins. They even utilised the museum’s 3D printer to produce miniature model tyres for their futuristic farm machinery.

3D printed tyres 3D printed tyres
Image: Alice Gibbons
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Future food Future food
Image: Alice Gibbons
Source: Museum Victoria
 

With the exhibition targeted at 8 to 12 year olds, the team have included many clever little twists to catch the eye of their audience. In one display, a model dolls house that shows the evolution of a child’s bedroom from the turn of the century to today, and references to contemporary pop culture are included in the form of mini Diablo and Angry Birds posters pasted on the walls of the modern bedroom. 

Bedroom diorama Bedroom diorama
Image: Alice Gibbons
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Other creations such as Michael Pennell’s future human figurines and Steven Sparrey’s silicone life sized mannequin (modelled from Michael's face) look like props right from the set of a new sci-fi blockbuster.

Future human figurines Future human figurines
Image: Alice Gibbons
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Think Ahead opens this week at Scienceworks.

Martin Sharp's Federation Tapestry

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
4 December 2013
Comments
Comments (0)

We're sorry to hear of the recent death of Sydney artist Martin Sharp, His many achievements – among them the co-creation of Oz magazine in the late 1960s and the psychedelic refurbishment of Sydney's Luna Park in the 1970s – Sharp designed the tenth and final panel of the Federation Tapestry which hangs in Melbourne Museum.

Celebrations 2001 Federation Tapestry Celebrations 2001, the tenth of the Federation Tapestry series, designed by Martin Sharp.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Central to Sharp's tapestry, titled Celebrations 2001, is one of his most often-used motifs: the word 'Eternity' in elegant copperplate script. This is a tribute to Arthur Stace who wrote the word on the streets of Sydney, anonymously, for decades. Sharp surrounded this centrepiece with other powerful images of Australia: 'Sorry' written in the sky above the Sydney Opera House, an artwork by Ginger Riley, a quote from Patrick White, and the First Fleet.

Links:

Tribute to Martin Sharp by Sean O'Brien on ABC Open

Infosheets about the Federation Tapestry

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Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

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