Budj Bim rangers

Author
by Kate C
Publish date
20 June 2011
Comments
Comments (2)

In March this year, MV scientists spent 10 days surveying the biodiversity of the Lake Condah area in a program called Bush Blitz. The project could never have happened without the collaboration and assistance of the Gunditjmara community, the Traditional Owners of Budj Bim lands around Lake Condah.

On Friday last week, the museum was pleased to return the hospitality and show a group of Budj Bim rangers and Traditional Owners around the collection stores and laboratories of the Natural Sciences Department.

Budj Bim rangers in store Budj Bim rangers in the Ornithology store, surrounded by the museum's collection of bird specimens.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Head of Sciences, Mark Norman, led a tour through the ornithology, entomology and marine collection stores. The bird collection was their favourite but the giant squid in its huge tank of ethanol was a special highlight too.

  Mark Norman showing the giant squid Mark Norman showing an amazing but somewhat pungent giant squid specimen.
Source: Museum Victoria
 

Today’s visit was a chance to show the rangers what has happened to the Lake Condah specimens they helped to collect, and the sort of research done in the museum. We hope they’ll visit us again soon. Until then, here's a reminder of the significance of Lake Condah and the aquaculture practiced there by Gunditjmara people for thousands of years. In this video, Joseph Saunders explains eel farming and traditional life at Lake Condah.

 

Links:

Budj Bim National Heritage Landscape

Comments (2)

sort by
newest
oldest
Rod 23 June, 2011 08:00
Another great post -- thanks!
reply
kim 23 June, 2011 13:13
So Interesting to hear about the aquaculture of the Gunditjmara people, and how Aunty Connie Hart learnt to weave. Incredible history from that country!
reply
Write your comment below All fields are required

We love receiving comments, but can’t always respond.

About this blog

Updates on what's happening at Melbourne Museum, the Immigration Museum, Scienceworks, the Royal Exhibition Building, and beyond.

Categories