Women with Clever Hands

Gapuwiyak Miyalkurruwurr Gong Djambatjmala

Past Event: 27 May 2011 to 28 August 2011

Joyce Milpuna Bidingal, Coiled basket (detail) 2007

An exhibition showcasing Aboriginal fibre work.

Women with Clever Hands features fibre work by women artists from Gapuwiyak in northeast Arnhem Land. The exhibition features baskets, bags, mats, sculptural figures and jewellery.

These beautiful works combine simple, functional shapes with intricate design, fine detail and subtle colour, all of which reflect the complexities of their land and their culture.

Comments (6)

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david 1 August, 2011 11:46
i liked the exhibition it was coooooool =)
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Na'dine 18 June, 2011 12:52
It's refreshing to see works full of colour , to celebrate women,life,culture and Arnhem Land. GIRL POWER!!!!!
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Kim 7 June, 2011 14:31
Wonderful Exhibtion!! Well done.
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emily mott 2 June, 2011 17:44
i was recently at th musum to help open the women with clever hands exhibition i have to admit i was abit surprised by the lack of preparation fom the museum as to when we shared our techniques
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Stephen Sharpe 1 June, 2011 18:51
Hi I am a teacher at St Raphael’s Primary School and I was recently with the school on an excursion. As part of the excursion we visited the Bunjilaka Gallery. While we were there one of our students asked me about Aboriginal art and I was able to show some of the examples of bark painting and other items that you had on display. I was surprised though to find no mention of rock engravings and I asked the guide who admitted that there was no information on display. This is strange because it is clear that rock engravings were a significant part of indigenous culture. Fred Mcarthy in “Australian Rock Art”, a book which I am sure I have seen in your bookshop, says that there are about the same number of rock engravings in Australia as there are rock paintings so to leave them out of a discussion about indigenous art would appear to be a disservice. Anyway, I thought I might mention it and it might be something you want to consider in the future. Thanks Stephen Sharpe Teacher St Raphael’s
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Ney 6 September, 2013 19:05
You have completely missed the point of the exhibition... It is an exhibition specifically based on the artistic work that women do with natural fibres in North Eastern Arnhem Land... at no point does the exhibition claim to demonstrate rock art?! I actually find it quite offensive that you have categorised and generalised Indigenous art... yes, while rock art is a significant part of Indigenous culture, by no means is it the only creative ritual that they participate in. If you want rock art get out in nature where it can be found... not in a museum.
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