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Postcard - MV Dundalk Bay, Irish Bay Lines, circa 1949 Image Reg. No: HT 1380

Summary:
Postcard of the Irish Bay Lines ship, MV Dundalk Bay, circa 1949. The postcard is stamped E. Stermole, and was collected by Erhard Stermole on his voyage to Australia in 1949. Following the occupation of the province of Gotschee in what was then Yugoslavia (now Slovenia) by Italian forces in 1941, Erhard and his parents and siblings were relocated to Germany. Gotschee had been colonised by German speakers in the 1300s and had a mixed Germanic and Slovene population at the time of its invasion.

In late 1941 and early 1942 many of the Gottscheer ethnic Germans (almost 12,000 people) were relocated to Brezice (Rann), Slovenia (at that time controlled by Germany). Erhard and his family were put on a train and finally allowed to disembark in Germany to live on a railway siding until getting to Austria to live in poor circumstances.

They later returned to Germany when Erhard's father Max joined the German army, and then moved to Austria to live with Erhard's grandparents on a property near the Croatian border. In 1944 the family split, with Max taking the two elder children, including Erhard, and his wife, Maria, taking the two younger children. In 1949 Max decided to migrate with his sons to Australia, they travelled on the 'Dundalk Bay' and were transferred to Bonegilla migrant camp on arrival.
Description:
Postcard with black and white image of a ship on the water on the front.
Acquisition Information:
Donation from Mr Ernie Stermole, 2003
Discipline: History
Dimensions: 8.8 cm (Width), 13.5 cm (Length)

More information

Tagged with: german communities, german immigration, world war ii 1939-1945, immigration, immigrant voyages, national identity, displaced persons, immigration selection, vaccination, migrant camps, slovenian communities, slovenian immigration
Themes this item is part of: Migration Collection, Transport Collection
Primary Classification: MIGRATION
Secondary Classification: Travel - Shipboard Life
Tertiary Classification: souvenirs
Inscriptions: Reverse stamped: E. Stermole.
Handwritten in pencil: Approx. 900 passengers.
Printed on reverse: Henry P. Lenaghan & sons, Ltd., 29 Donegall Street, Belfast.
Format: Postcard: Black & White
Issued By: Irish Bay Lines, Belfast, County Antrim, Ireland, 1949
User: Mr Ernie Stermole, 1949
Ship Depicted: ., 1949

Comments

Pamela Cullinan Posted on 06 Jul 2012 9:45 AM
My father worked, was a partner with Harry Lenaghan (Irish Bay Lines) in Belfast, the company moved from Donegal Street, to a new building The Irish Bay Lines in Gt, Georges Street Belfast, in 1952, All the ships in the fleet were named after "Bays" around Ireland; eg. Bangor Bay, Bantry Bay, Dundrum Bay etc. hope this will help you. regards P. cullinan (nee Walmsley)
Donald McCubbin Posted on 23 Aug 2012 8:00 AM
My father was Chief Officer on the Dundalk Bay in the early 1950's. I spent an extended summer holiday on the ship in the summer of 1954 when she was "arrested" due to a non payment of debt by the owner. The ship had discharged at Tilbury and was then moored in the Thames with an Admiralty Marshall on board and a writ pinned up in the Wheelhouse. She remained in the Thames for about 12 weeks.
Ilya Nasuta Posted on 03 Jul 2013 9:25 AM
My Father, Anatoly (Tony) Nasuta along with his mother, Alexandra Vasilyevna Nasuta (nee Hukov) emigrated to New Zealand on this vessel in 1949.
Gabriella Gresz Posted on 02 Sep 2013 6:18 PM
I with my family came to Australia on the last journey of this ship, arriving in Newcastle. I agree the accommodation was very basic and the food terrible.
Denis Martin Posted on 14 Jan 2014 8:57 AM
Reference the "arrest" of the Dundalk Bay in the Thames. My grandfather was master of her at the time. He was Captain William Quaite, and was/became Marine Superintendent for Irish Bay Lines.
Brian Lenaghan Posted on 13 Feb 2014 2:02 AM
My father, Henry Patrick Lenaghan, owned the Dundalk Bay. The family travelled to Australia on her in 1949, on holiday. We returned in style, First Class, on a P & O Ship, Orcades. I remember Captain Quaite, a very fine man; he had to be, to control my father! Sadly, his financial situation went from bad to worse, as was often the case in shipping. He passed away in 1993 and his ashes her scattered at sea off the County Down coast.
John Thomas Atherton Posted on 01 Apr 2014 2:18 PM
In febuary 1953 I sail from the river Tyne on the Dundalk Bay, as first trip Cabin boy, after tramping all round the world,we discharged in the Thames in febuary 1954,I never knew what happened to her after that.
Marcel Dimo Posted on 09 Apr 2014 8:13 PM
My father and mother, Dimitrije Brkic and Helga Brkic, arrived in Melbourne, Australia on this ship on 22 June 1949. My brother Gorol was with them, aged 3. I was born in Ballarat Victoria in April 1950.
Marcel Dimo
John Thomas Atherton Posted on 20 Jun 2014 11:52 AM
After much searching i think i have lade to rest the story of the Dundalk Bay. She was built as the cargo ship Nurnberg in germany 1936. During WW2 she was converted to a repair ship for the German Navy.In May 1945 she was captured by the British in Copenhagen and converted into a depot ship.In 1947 she was transferred to the MOT and in 1948 sold to H.P.Lenaghan of Belfast and renamed Dundalk Bay. In 1949 she was became a emigrant ship for service from Europe to Australasia. In 1951 she reverted to a normal cargo ship. In 1957 she was sold to Duff Herbert & Mitchell of Liverpool and renamed Westbay sadly on 2nd September 1962 she arrived in Hamburg for breaking up. later i found this # i remember the Westbay being laid up in Albert Edward Dock in the river Tyne for many years early in the 1960's. there was a note of Chinese buyers being interested in her in 1961 but the following year she was broken up in Hamburg

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