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Compass - Andrew Jack, Trans- Antarctic Expedition, Ross Sea Party, 1914-1917 Object Reg. No: ST 031400

Summary:
Compass used by Andrew Jack on sledging journeys as part of the Ross Sea party of the Trans- Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917 led by Ernest Shackleton.
This is part of Museum Victoria's collection of artefacts from the 'Heroic Era' exploration of Antarctica.
Description:
Round brass compass with hinged black flip lid. Silver and black face features red cardinal points of north, south east and west and a silver magnetised pivoting needle. Compass has external ring attachment.
Statement Of Significance:
This is a significant artefact from the little-known Ross Sea Party of Ernest Shackleton's Trans-Antarctic Expedition.
Acquisition Information:
Loan & Subsequent Transfer from National Museum of Victoria, 1967
Discipline: Technology
Dimensions: 80 mm (Height), 57 mm (Width)
Dimension Comment: Dimensions taken with lid closed. When lid is open, Width: 109mm

More information

Tagged with: antarctic exploration, compasses, navigation apparatus instruments, making history - antarctic
Themes this item is part of: Andrew Keith Jack, Antarctic Explorer (?-1966), Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, Antarctica Collection, Science & Measurement Collection, Transport Collection
On Display at: Melbourne Museum
Primary Classification: EXPLORATION
Secondary Classification: Antarctic
Tertiary Classification: navigation instruments
Inscriptions: Painted on glass: N / E / S / W
Expedition Leader: Ernest Shackleton, Antarctica, 1914-1917
User: Andrew Jack, Antarctica, 1914-1917

Original owner of compass.
Place & Date Used: Ross Sea, Antarctica, 1914-1917

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