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Typesetting Machine - Mergenthaler Linotype Model 1 Line Casting, 1896 Object Reg. No: ST 026746

Summary:
Linotype machine, manufactured by Mergenthaler Linotype Co., USA and is dated to 1896. It was used in the production of the Launceston Examiner from 1896 to 1953. It was one of the first linotypes in Australia and the first in Tasmania.

There is a single magazine on the machine and the magazine and matrices are not interchangeable with later machines.
A key is pushed for each character of text being set. An operator using a keyboard types an instruction that drops the letter matrix from a magazine. The matrixes form a line and then are moved to a mould, where lead is injected. The line is ejected from the mould and the matrices are taken back and distributed automatically into the magazine, ready for use again.

A linotype sets the type from which a newspaper is printed. A printing press prints - a typesetting machine sets type for the printing press..

The machine has a single magazine which held 8pt type and is thus known as a Brevier model.

This is one of two machines installed at The Examiner newspaper office in March 1896. This would date its manufacture to 1895 and possibly 1894. Known as a Model 1, it is the third generation of linotype machines. The first was known as the 'Blower Linotype', the second the 'Square Base' and the third, the Simplex, or Model 1 as it came to be known. The Model 1 replaced the square base, introducing a lighter base known as the star or 'claw' which became standard on most later models. There were technological advances on all machines, but the Model 1 was the last machine invented during Mergenthaler's lifetime. The second machine purchased by The Examiner was donated to the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston. Both machines had been converted to electricity on the melting pots. The machines appeared to have been traded in and Carmichael & Co, the agents and distributors for Mergenthaler Linotype products, wanted the electric heating unit on the machine because of its commercial value. They replaced the electric unit with the original gas unit. This Model 1 has the double pulley for steam power drive. W. R. Rolph & Sons [The Examiner, Launceston] advised that they had attached the inscribed presentation plate.

Operation
An operator using a keyboard types an instruction that drops a letter matrix from a magazine. The matrixes form a line, are moved to a mould, where lead is injected. The line is ejected from the mould and the matrices are taken back and distributed automatically into the magazine, ready for use again. The set line - the line-of-type - is ejected from the mould into a galley.
Acquisition Information:
Donation from The Examiner, 1964
Discipline: Technology
Dimensions: 2000 mm (Height), 1400 mm (Width), 1400 mm (Length)

More information

Tagged with: printing equipment, printing, typesetting machines
Themes this item is part of: Information & Communication Collection
Primary Classification: COMMUNICATIONS
Secondary Classification: Printing
Tertiary Classification: typesetting
Inscriptions: Brass label on top: Linotype
Brass presentation plate: Model 1 Linotype used in the production/Of "The Examiner", Launceston, Tasmania/From 1896 to 1963/Presented by Carmichael & Co. Ltd./Australian distributors for the Mergenthaler Linotype Co., New York
Manufacturer: Mergenthaler Linotype Co, New York, United States of America, 1896
User: The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, 1896-1953
References: Sources used by Peter Marsh (5 July 2007) for this record:
Museum Archives, Unit 00171/119/1, Files 63, 67, 71, 72, 74, 81, 82
Kahan, Basil, Ottmar Mergenthaler: The Man and his Machine, Oak Knoll Press, 2000

Comments

Gary Posted on 09 May 2012 4:43 PM
Did my apprenticeship at Dudley E. King Linotypers in Melbourne. Finished my time in 1969. Was sad to see the ending of hot metal setting.
David Beard Posted on 11 Aug 2013 2:43 PM
I served my apprenticeship at "The Border Morning Mail" Albury NSW as a hand and machine compositor commencing in December 1963. Worked on many newspapers as an operator and enjoyed mastering the lino having operated a model 1 in Kalgoorlie and the following models 5, 8, 14, 31, 48, 78 and the last model manufactured in America, the Elktron Mark II. My greatest achievement in the industry as being given the chance to view the battery of 50 Elktrons at "The Sydney Morning Herald" running on TTS tape.

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