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Lithographic Stone - Opening Ceremony, Princes Bridge, 1850 Object Reg. No: ST 025960

Summary:
Lithographic stone illustrating the opening ceremony at Princes Bridge, Melbourne in 1850.

Princes Bridge crosses the Yarra River in the heart of Melbourne, Australia. Three bridges (as of 2008) have been built across the river in this place.The first was built in 1844 and the second, the subject of this image, in 1850. The third bridge was built in 1888.

Edited extract from Wikipedia:
Lithography is a method for printing using a plate or stone with a completely smooth surface. This is in contrast to engraving or etching, where cavities are produced to contain the printing ink, and in woodblock printing and letterpress where ink is applied to the raised surfaces of letters or images. Lithography uses oil or fat and gum arabic to divide the smooth surface into hydrophobic regions which accept the ink, and hydrophilic regions which reject it and thus become the background.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithograph - accessed 27 November 2008.
Description:
The stone is kept inside a wooden case, which was made in October 1966.
Acquisition Information:
Unknown from Unknown
Discipline: Technology
Dimensions: 80 mm (Height), 620 mm (Width), 530 mm (Length)
Dimension Comment: Case for stone: L 560 mm W 650 H 100 mm

More information

Tagged with: lithographic stones, printing, printing equipment
Themes this item is part of: Information & Communication Collection
Primary Classification: COMMUNICATIONS
Secondary Classification: Printing
Tertiary Classification: printing type, blocks & plates
Inscriptions: Text inverted
Date Depicted: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 1850
References: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithograph - accessed 27 November 2008
http://www.mspong.org/cyclopedia/lithography.html - accessed 27 November 2008

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