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Broadcast Receiver - Healing, Golden Voice, Model 503B, circa 1949 Object Reg. No: ST 035945

Summary:
Healing Golden Voice model 503B, circa 1949, made by Healing Australia.

Portable battery powered radio with 5 miniature valves.

The supply voltages for the radio are 1.5 and 90 volts. The two pin plug plugged into the 1.5 V 'A' battery, and the two three pin plugs plugged into a pair of 45 V 'B' batteries. The 'A' battery was usually a long rectangular box with a number of 1.5 V cells in parallel, the current drawn by this set was 300 mA. The load on the 'B' battery was 13 mA. The 'B' batteries would have been Eveready 'Minimax' type 482, the 'A' battery would have been type 742 or 745. These of course have not been made for many years.
The plug connections are:
Two pin plug: Thick pin is the +1.5V connection and thin pin is the negative connection (it is connected to the chassis).
Three pin plug: Viewed with the pins facing away, the left hand pin of the pair close together is the +45 V connection, and the pin by itself is the negative connection.
Information supplied by the Historical Radio Society of Australia.
Description:
In wooden, leatherette covered case, with carrying handle. Superheterodyne circuit. Nine inch inbuilt "Rola" model 8k speaker. Batteries used externally to case. Note large and complex white plastic speaker grille.
Acquisition Information:
Donation from Mrs M. Kennedy
Discipline: Technology
Dimensions: 27 cm (Height), 32 cm (Width), 17 cm (Length)

More information

Tagged with: radio receivers, television receivers
Themes this item is part of: Information & Communication Collection
Primary Classification: COMMUNICATIONS
Secondary Classification: Radio
Tertiary Classification: receivers
Manufacturer: Healing Radio, Australia, circa 1949

Comments

Trevor Griffiths Posted on 14 Feb 2010 2:49 PM
Hello, Could you please tell me what voltage the 503B Golden Voice uses as its power supply. The one I have just bought has 3 leads with male plugs for batteries. One 2 pin plug and 2 with 3 pin plugs. Thank you, Trevor.
Discovery Centre Posted on 18 Feb 2010 11:29 AM
Museum Victoria Comment
Hi Trevor - The supply voltages for the radio are 1.5 and 90 volts. The two pin plug plugged into the 1.5 V 'A' battery, and the two three pin plugs plugged into a pair of 45 V 'B' batteries. The 'A' battery was usually a long rectangular box with a number of 1.5 V cells in parallel, the current drawn by this set was 300 mA. The load on the 'B' battery was 13 mA. The 'B' batteries would have been Eveready 'Minimax' type 482, the 'A' battery would have been type 742 or 745. These of course have not been made for many years. The plug connections are:
Two pin plug: Thick pin is the +1.5V connection and thin pin is the negative connection (it is connected to the chassis). Three pin plug: Viewed with the pins facing away, the left hand pin of the pair close together is the +45 V connection, and the pin by itself is the negative connection.
Information supplied by the Historical Radio Society of Australia.
Herb Jurkiewicz Posted on 09 Apr 2013 2:39 PM
Thanks for the useful info about battery connections. I had found one of these radios in country SA last year and bought it.
This morning I finally connected 2 sets of 9v batteries to give me the required 2x 45v. A 1.5v D cell was easy to connect. I powered it up and ... it came to life. A wonderful result!
I think these portables can still work because the original components are not as stressed as in a mains powered valve radio.
Jamie Posted on 27 Jan 2014 8:12 PM
Hi... can any one help with the colour coding of the battery supply wiring, as someone has removed the two/three pin plugs. There are only four wires that go into the chassis: black, orange, blue, white.... it looks like the black/ orange are the low voltage supply and the blue/white are the high voltage supply (Please confirm??) If this is so, what are the polarity designations for the different colours? The radio I have used to be my grandpa's, and given that he died in 1973, means this unit hasn't been powered up for at least 40 years!! I've always dreamt of bringing it back to life. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks. Jamie of Hahndorf South Australia.

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