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Telegraph Mirror Galvanometer - Elliott Brothers, circa 1900 Object Reg. No: ST 008425

Summary:
Mirror galvanometer used for receiving telegraph signals transmitted through submarine cables.

Such signals were too weak and distorted to drive conventional telegraph receiving equipment. The mirror galvanometer was very sensitive. It indicated the arrival of signal current by rotating a small mirror which deflected a beam of light across a screen for interpretation by the operator.

Made by Elliott Brothers of London, about 1900.
Description:
Circular wooden base with central wooden column supporting horizontal brass cylinder with ebonite (?) end plates. Vertical brass rod above cylinder, supporting curved magnet. Brass and steel components. Four brass terminals on wooden base.
Acquisition Information:
Donation from Victoria: Public Works Department (PWD), 1916
Discipline: Technology
Dimensions: 494 mm (Height), 228 mm (Width), 228 mm (Length), 228 mm (Diameter)

More information

Tagged with: electric apparatus instruments, electrical equipment, galvanometers, telegraphy
Themes this item is part of: Australia and the global telegraph network 1854-1902, The Australian telegraph network 1854-1877, Telegraphy Collection, Information & Communication Collection, Science & Measurement Collection
Primary Classification: COMMUNICATIONS
Secondary Classification: Telegraphy
Tertiary Classification: testing equipment
Inscriptions: Label on wooden base:
"ELLIOTT BROS
449
STRAND
LONDON"

One end plate of horizontal cylinder engraved:
"No. 254"
Maker: Elliott Bros, London, England, Great Britain, 1895-1915
Bibliography:
  1. [Catalogue] 1895. Elliott Brothers (London) Catalogue., E4, 1895, 11 Pages

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