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Notebook - CSIRAC Computer, Programming, Geoff Hill, 1951-1952 Document Reg. No: MM 028287

Summary:
Programming notebook kept by Geoff Hill dated 1951. Hill developed the user-friendly programming system called Interprogram.

A number of punch cards are inserted between various pages. The cards were made by Hollerith. It is not known whether the pages refer to those cards. However, this is evidence of the early use of Hollerith cards in a computer. The unique 12 hole paper tape technology was developed for CSIRAC only and was based on the 12 hole Hollerith card. The 12 hole paper tape technology was adopted because Trevor Pearcey thought the card technology was too slow.
Description:
Grey cardboard covered notebook with red spine. Loose pieces of paper and control punch cards are interleaved at various pages throughout book. pp28-29 Handwritten folded page; pp68-69 2 pieces of paper with typed text; pp80-81 2
control punch cards; pp82-83 5 x control punch cards; pp94-95 5 x control punch cards.
Statement Of Significance:
A number of punch cards are inserted between various pages of this notebook. The cards were made by Hollerith. This is evidence of the early use of Hollerith cards in a computer.
Acquisition Information:
Donation from University of Melbourne (The) Computer Science & Software Engineering Department, 2012
Discipline: Technology
Dimensions: 330 mm (Height), 205 mm (Width)

More information

Tagged with: computer software, computers, computing, csirac computer, making history - csirac
Themes this item is part of: Information & Communication Collection, CSIRAC Collection
Primary Classification: COMPUTING & CALCULATING
Secondary Classification: Digital Computing
Tertiary Classification: programming
Inscriptions: First page of notebook: 15/8/51
Each card includes the text 'Hollerith'
Creator: Geoff Hill - The University of Melbourne Computation Laboratory, 1951
Commissioned By: Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Building Research Division, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1951

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