Common Froglet Crinia signifera

Frogs of Victoria series

Identification

The Common Froglet is variable in colour and back pattern. The main colour ranges from light grey, fawn or brown to dark grey or brown to almost black and patterns include broad or narrow stripes and blotches. The belly is granular with black or very dark fairly solid markings. Total length to about 30 mm.

Photo of Common Froglet, Crinia signifera

Common Froglet
Photographer: Peter Robertson. Source: Wildlife Profiles Pty. Ltd.

Distribution and habitat

The Common Froglet is widely distributed throughout Victoria, from the Alpine regions to the plains. It is found hiding under logs and vegetation in damp situations such as streams, ponds or lakes during the day.

Biology

Females lay eggs in wetlands such as dams, ponds, and swamps. Metamorphosis takes 40–70 days.

Further Reading

Barker, J., Grigg, G. and Tyler, M. J. 1995. A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty & Sons, Sydney.

Cogger, H. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, Sydney.

Hero, J. M., Littlejohn, M. & Marantelli, G. 1991. Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, East Melbourne.

Tyler, M. J. 1992. Encyclopaedia of Australian Animals: Frogs. Angus & Robertson, Sydney.

Comments (9)

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Alice rankcom 27 March, 2011 16:11
what do these frogs like to eat?
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Discovery Centre 30 March, 2011 12:55

Hi Alice,

Common Froglets like to eat small insects.


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glenn davidson 21 November, 2012 15:04
what food do you feed these in their tadpole state, boiled lettuce, fish flakes etc?, once they have morphed to frogs are pin head crickets a good source of food for them?
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Discovery Centre 22 November, 2012 11:25

Hi Glenn, frozen lettuce or bok choy is easier than having to boil lettuce. Freezing breaks down the leaves and makes them easier for the tadpoles to digest. Fish flakes are good but they do tend to foul up the water quickly. Frozen spinach is also good for tadpoles but should be restricted to once a week or so, or the tadpoles’ digestive system backs up.

Pin head crickets are probably too small for adult frogs – the next size up would be preferable, or even bigger depending on the size of the frogs. It’s also helpful to mix up the crickets with other live insects.

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Raaid 19 February, 2014 10:25
Hi, I'm just wondering if they like to eat small household moths?
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Discovery Centre 1 March, 2014 15:48

Hi Raaid, common froglets will eat small household moths as well as other invertebrates such as flies, cockroaches, mosquitoes and caterpillars. 

Fiona 1 September, 2014 11:43
How long do common froglets live for?
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DARREN QUINN 15 June, 2015 11:47
have these frogs when winter fills the wetlands across road, have found them in dog bowls after flooding my block....but I want to set up pond and breed them for their music but im paraplegic and is terribly hard to to get into nesting areas where spawned tadpoles are....anyw place I can buy tadpoles,eggs etc so I can put into protective pond with wire coverage t keep predators out but wide enough for mosquitoes to fly into etc...thx f advice on feeding.....eventually wish t add connecting pond an have fountain to help clean ,gentle filters guarded not to pull in young spry...where to buy????
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Discovery Centre 28 June, 2015 12:09

Hi Darren - we checked this with our Live Exhibits team, who have said that while it’s legal to keep some frog species with a licence and some species without a licence, all frogs must be purchased from a licenced dealer and they must not be released into the wild.

One of the main reasons for these regulations is to prevent the spread of chytrid fungus, which devastates local frog populations from time to time. The best option is to offer frogs the best possible habitat, and in time the frogs will usually come, particularly as you already have them on your property. Netting will help keep birds out but you may not need to filter the water, as water bodies in outside environments tend to balance themselves. There are a range of websites with advice on constructing frog ponds, for example:

http://fnpw.org.au/PDFS/Resources/Pond.pdf

http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/fact-sheets/pets/pets-pet-care-native-animals/building-a-frog-pond/#.VY5KX1R-9IA

http://savethefrogs.com/ponds/

http://www.sgaonline.org.au/frogs/

http://www.hornsby.nsw.gov.au/media/documents/environment-and-waste/bushland-and-biodiversity/gardens-for-wildlife/Build-a-mini-frog-pond.pdf