Common Spade-foot Toad Neobatrachus sudelli

Frogs of Victoria series

Identification

The Common Spade-foot Toad has a black-edged metatarsal tubercle on the hind foot, which is used for digging. This frog is very variable in colour and may be grey, brown, yellow or reddish brown. The pattern is usually a mottled greyish green. Maximum length is 40 mm.

Photo of Common Spade-foot Toad, Neobatrachus sudelli

Common Spade-foot Toad
Photographer: Peter Robertson / Source: Wildlife Profiles Pty. Ltd.

Distribution and habitat

The Common Spade-foot Toad occurs throughout western and northern Victoria in a range of habitats, from the basalt plains to mallee heaths.

Biology

Females lay large eggs in ephemeral waters such as ponds or wheel ruts, where the mortality rate is extremely high, and more permanent waters such as dams.

Further Reading

Barker, J., Grigg, G. and Tyler, M. J. 1995. A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty & Sons, Sydney.

Cogger, H. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, Sydney.

Hero, J. M., Littlejohn, M. & Marantelli, G. 1991. Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, East Melbourne.

Tyler, M. J. 1992. Encyclopaedia of Australian Animals: Frogs. Angus & Robertson, Sydney.

Comments (4)

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Aubrey 14 June, 2009 08:39
We are in Omak, Washington and we caught one of these toads last night. It was almost a bluish grey instead of green. It was so beautiful. Our 2 year old son loved it...we had it inside for awhile and in our bath tub so we could see him swim!!! We let him go in our garden and said bye!!! Absolutly a beautiful creature!!!
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Emma - Wallan, Victoria 4 July, 2010 23:32
What is the general diet for these little guys? Thank you
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Discovery Centre 6 July, 2010 15:57

Hi Emma, these toads mainly eat insects, but also any small arthropod wandering past would be potential food – spiders, slaters, small centipedes etc

 

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micah 21 August, 2010 09:26
they are not toads there frogs from the Neobatrachus genus their a burrowing frog that looks toad like but we do not get any toads in victoria in the whole of australia we only have one toad the cane toad which was introduced
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