Victorian Smooth Froglet Geocrinia victoriana

Frogs of Victoria series

Identification

The Victorian Smooth Froglet, Geocrinia Victoriana, is a small smooth-bodied species growing to just under 30 mm in length. It is usually fairly darkly coloured, with pinkish marbling on the thighs and a pink spot in the groin.

Photo of Victorian Smooth Froglet

Victorian Smooth Froglet
Photographer: Peter Robertson. Source: Wildlife Profiles Pty. Ltd.

Distribution and habitat

This frog is usually found in hilly or mountainous forest habitats across much of southern Victoria.

Biology

The diet consists of small invertebrates. Eggs are laid in gelatinous masses in damp situations, such as under bark or in wet wheel ruts. Tadpoles are free-swimming in still water. They grow to a maximum length of 31 mm and take up to 8 months to metamorphose.

Further Reading

Barker, J., Grigg, G. and Tyler, M. J. 1995. A Field Guide to Australian Frogs. Surrey Beatty & Sons, Sydney.

Cogger, H. 2000. Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia. Reed Books, Sydney.

Hero, J. M., Littlejohn, M. & Marantelli, G. 1991. Frogwatch Field Guide to Victorian Frogs. Department of Conservation and Environment, East Melbourne.

Tyler, M. J. 1992. Encyclopaedia of Australian Animals: Frogs. Angus & Robertson, Sydney.

Comments (7)

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Printable Bill of Sale 7 May, 2013 13:53
Along the open woodlands and grasslands of Northern Australia, one can find a very dangerous snake called the Taipan. It is one of the natural predators of the The Victorian Smooth Frog-let.
John T.Sherril 11 May, 2013 14:07
Since you mentioned the taipain there's an interesting note about the taipan is that they became very prolific due to the poison toads that were introduced into Australia. Because many frog eating snakes died when they ingested these toads, the taipan had less competition for habitat and food. Because of this, the taipan is considered common in it’s range of Northern Australia’s coastline.
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Jane 4 May, 2013 17:15
I accidentally unearthed a fat brown frog, quite smooth skin while digging. It was covered in soil. Could it have been hibernating underground? About 4 cm long. Location: Briagolong area. Date 4 May 2013. Do you know what species it was?
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Discovery Centre 7 May, 2013 11:10
Hello Jane - we can't suggest an identification without an image, it could possibly have been a Pobblebonk which commonly burrows, however not strictly speaking to 'hibernate'. If you have an image, you can send is to us via our Ask the Experts page so we can see if we can have it identified for you
lana 12 September, 2011 14:40
whate are some more predators beside snakes and also what sort of inscts do they eat
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micah 22 April, 2011 20:11
Geocrinas (genus) and the Crinia genus they are restricted to small inveretebrates. This species of frog is quite secretive hiding in and under logs,under rocks,leaf liter ect. but if a snake came across one (a decent size meal for a white-lipped snake or juveniles of our large elapids may eat one).
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Eliza 27 May, 2010 11:35
What do the Victorian Smooth frog eat? and what are there predators? Thanks :)
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