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Cunningham's Skink

Cunningham's Skink

Cunningham's Skink
Cunningham's Skink
Photographer - Peter Robertson
Source - Wildlife Profiles Pty. Ltd

Egernia cunninghami

Cunningham's Skinks are a large, rough-scaled skink inhabiting rocky areas where they seek shelter in rock crevices, or under exfoliating rocks. They bask in the sun to warm up, and can lie on warmed rocks to maintain their preferred temperature. During winter or cold periods, they simply retreat further into the rock crevices. Some occasionally use cracks in trees for shelter. The ridged backward-facing scales of the lower body and tail make it difficult for predators to extract the lizards from rock crevices.

These skinks are viviparous (live bearing). They mate during early to mid spring, and give birth to four to six live young in mid to late summer. Like many reptiles, the males are much more likely to be moving around during the mating season, with females doing additional basking while they are gravid (pregnant). Cunningham's Skinks feed mostly on fruits and seeds, and will also take insects and other very small forest animals.

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