Portable Studio

Talking Difference in 2014

In 2014, the Talking Difference Portable Studio has visited libraries and community centres in Swan Hill (Swan Hill Public Library), Geelong (Corio Library and Belmont Library), and Hobsons Bay (Altona North Community, Laverton Hub, Williamstown Library and Altona Meadows Library and Learning Centre), creating opportunities for a broad range of people to have their say.

Community workshops, open to the public, were held in all of these venues. During these workshops, participants were able to discuss how race based discrimination has affected their lives, their sense of identity, and the communities they live in. Questions were generated in these workshops, and these questions were then recorded onto the studio for the general public to respond to.

Examples of questions generated during workshops:

  • Have you ever been stereotyped? What happened? How did it make you feel?
  • How do you identify yourself?
  • Have you ever experienced racism? How did it make you feel?
  • Were you born in another country? How long did it take you to feel like you belonged in Australia?
  • Do you speak English with an accent? How does it change the way people view you?
  • What is the best thing about living in a multicultural country like Australia?

 

Participants are able to record their responses on four ways:

 

Respond by recording a video of  themselves:

Question: How can Australia change to become more inclusive?

 

View video with transcript 

Respond by creating a drawing:

Question: Have you ever said anything racist to someone? How do you think it made them feel?

  computer generated drawing Response to the question - "Have you ever said anything racist to someone? How do you think it made them feel?"  

Respond by writing something:

Question: It is ok to tell a joke about someone’s race or ethnicity?

No, not at all. People need to be aware that jokes about race, skin colour, nationality, are not on! My dad came to Australia in the 1950s, and he would be called ‘wog’ and ‘dago’, and be told ‘ go back to where you came from’. This is not on. We should welcome all to our country. Jess, 25.

Respond by recording an audio track:

Question: Were you born in another country? How long did it take for you to feel like you belonged in Australia?

 

Transcript

I was born here in Australia but my parents were born in Italy, they came to Australia in the 1950’s, and they believed Australia would provide them with a better life, and it has. It did take them a while to feel that they belonged, but now they are happy to call Australia their home, but still love their home country Italy.