Anomalocaris – a Cambrian super-predator

(an-om-al-oh-car-iss)

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Model of Anomalocaris Arthropod (Lobopod).
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

The fossilised mouthparts of Anomalocaris.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Cambrian

HOW BIG IT WAS

Anomalocaris relative size depiction as described below
Anomalocaris was 60–80cm long.

The Burgess Shale of British Columbia in Canada is a rich source of fossils that help us understand life in the Cambrian Period. The fine-grained rock has preserved details of many types of extinct marine animals, including soft-bodied and thin-shelled forms that are not commonly fossilised.

Larger animals with a hard exoskeleton have also been found here, and one of these is Anomalocaris, the top predator of its time. Fossils of Anomalocaris and its relatives have been found in China, North America and in South Australia.

WHERE IT WAS FOUND

Anomalocaris map

This fossil of Anomalocaris was discovered in Canada.

RELATED OBJECTS

Other objects from the Cambrian

RedlichiaArchaeocyathidsWiwaxiaGreenstonesDookie mineralsSedimentary rocks
Photograph of a yellow plastic Tyranasaurus Rex