Koolasuchus – a large amphibious tetrapod

(cool-a-sue-cuss)

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Fossil jaws of Koolasuchus cleelandi.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Illustration of Koolasuchus cleelandi.
Image: Peter Trusler
Source: Peter Trusler

Cretaceous

HOW BIG IT WAS

Koolasuchus relative size depiction as described below
The jaws of Koolasuchus were approximately 75 cm long.

Koolasuchus was a large predator belonging to an ancient group of amphibious tetrapods called temnospondyls. This group dominated for millions of years before virtual extinction at the end of the Triassic. The discovery of this Cretaceous Koolasuchus fossil near San Remo showed that the temnospondyls persisted in Victoria after they had died out elsewhere in the world.

Resembling something between a huge newt and a crocodile, Koolasuchus is thought to have lived in the cool streams of the Victorian rift valley, waiting to ambush its unsuspecting prey.

 

WHERE IT WAS FOUND

Koolasuchus map

This fossil of Koolasuchus was discovered in Victoria.

RELATED OBJECTS

Other objects from the Cretaceous

PlatypterygiusMuttaburrasaurusBishopsBlack coalQantassaurusBostrychoceras

Related Resources