Crinoids – lilies of the sea

(cry-noids)

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Model of the crinoid, Glyptocrinus dyeri.
Image: Benjamin Healley
Source: Museum Victoria

Fossil of the crinoid, Glyptocrinus dyeri.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Ordovician

HOW BIG IT WAS

Crinoids relative size depiction as described below
These crinoids grew about 25 cm tall.

Crinoids, or ‘sea lilies’, are echinoderms related to sea urchins and sea stars. They appeared in the Cambrian and were one of the most abundant animals in Palaeozoic seas.

Crinoids have cup-shaped bodies with many flexible arms, often lined with tentacle-like pinnules used to gather food. Most early crinoids used a long stem for attachment, but most forms living today are stemless.

A TRAIL THROUGH TIME

Crinoids first appeared in the Cambrian and survive to this day. See how they've changed over time.

Periechocrinus PentremitesJimbacrinus

WHERE IT WAS FOUND

Crinoids map

This fossil of Glyptocrinus dyeri was discovered in the USA.

RELATED OBJECTS

Other objects from the Ordovician

GraptolitesArandaspisPhosphate mineralsNeoasaphus

Related Resources

Photograph of a yellow plastic Tyranasaurus Rex