Neoasaphus – trilobites evolving diversity

(nee-oh-ass-a-fuss)

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Model of the trilobite, Neoasaphus kowalbevskii.
Image: Benjamin Healley
Source: Museum Victoria

Fossil of the trilobite, Neoasaphus kowalbevskii.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Ordovician

HOW BIG IT WAS

Neoasaphus relative size depiction as described below
The fossil of Neoasaphus is approximately 5 cm long.

Trilobites were at their zenith at the start of the Ordovician with over 60 different families living in a variety of marine environments. The morphological diversity of this group peaked during the Ordovician too – they came in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, and some became powerful swimmers. Neoasaphus probably had good vision thanks to its stalked compound eyes.

After this phase of rapid evolution, the mighty trilobites began to decline, becoming rare by the Carboniferous before complete extinction at the end of the Permian.

A trail through time

Trilobites appeared in the Cambrian and went extinct in the Permian. See how they changed through time.

RedlichiaDicranurusDipleuraProetids

WHERE IT WAS FOUND

Map for Neoasaphus

This fossil of Neoasaphus kowalbevskii was discovered in Russia.

RELATED OBJECTS

Other objects from the Ordovician

GraptolitesArandaspisPhosphate mineralsCrinoids

Related Resources

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