Periechocrinus – a stemmed crinoid

(per-ee-cho-cry-nuss)

Click to view a larger image. Click to view a larger image.

Fossil of the Crinoid (sea lily), Periechocrinus moniliformis.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Fossil of the Crinoid (sea lily), Periechocrinus moniliformis.
Source: Museum Victoria

Silurian

HOW BIG IT WAS

Periechocrinus  relative size depiction as described below
Periechocrinus was approximately 30 cm high.

During the Silurian, Crinoids were very abundant and many different species are preserved in limestone deposits worldwide. They sometimes lived in large accumulations known as ‘crinoid gardens’. Some crinoids grew stems up to 30 metres long. When the animals died, ocean currents often broke up the remains and rolled them together in vast amounts to form thick deposits of limestone. In Victoria, crinoidal limestones are found in the Lilydale, Kinglake and Buchan districts.

A TRAIL THROUGH TIME

Crinoids first appeared in the Cambrian and survive to this day. See how they've changed over time.

CrinoidsPeriechocrinus PentremitesJimbacrinus

WHERE IT WAS FOUND

Perichocrinus map

This fossil of Periechocrinus moniliformis was discovered in the UK.

RELATED OBJECTS

Other objects from the Silurian

BaragwanathiaNautiloidsEurypteridsKalbarria