Cladiscites – a surviving cephalopod

(clad-ee-sigh-tees)

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Model of the cephalopod, Cladiscites tornatus.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Fossil of the cephalopod, Cladiscites tornatus.
Image: Jon Augier
Source: Museum Victoria

Triassic

HOW BIG IT WAS

Cladiscites relative size depiction as described below
Cladiscites was approximately 17 cm long.

After the devastation of the extinction event at the end of the Permian only a few species of cephalopods survived – a pattern this group encountered in several other mass extinctions. Cladiscites was an ammonoid cephalopod. Although the fossil has a series of ornate squiggle patterns, these were internal structures called sutures that were not on the shell’s outer surface. Other fossils of Cladiscites show that the shell’s surface was finely ridged.

A TRAIL THROUGH TIME

Cephalopods first appeared in the Silurian and survive to this day. See how this group has changed over time.

NautiloidsPtenoceras GoniatitesParalegocerasBelemnitesBostrychoceras

WHERE IT WAS FOUND

Cladiscites map

This fossil of Cladiscites tornatus was discovered in Austria.

RELATED OBJECTS

Other objects from the Triassic

LystrosaurusThinnfeldiaCoelophysisClatrotitan