Dry Forest in Victoria

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River Red Gums growing along the Murray River.
Image: Rodney Start
Source: Museum Victoria

Dry Forest canopy.
Image: Jenni Meaney
Source: Museum Victoria

Many animals need tree hollows.
Image: Kate Phillips
Source: Museum Victoria

Box-ironbark forest, Greytown central Victoria.
Image: Jenni Meaney
Source: Museum Victoria

A light and spacious forest
Eucalypts in flower, a nectar feast for birds and insects
Old trees with deep hollows are home to possums, birds and bats
Young trees are planted to connect forest fragments

There are many types of dry forests in Victoria. Stringybark forests dominate the lowlands east of Western Port; red gum forests survive along major rivers in the north, grassy woodlands are scattered throughout the Western District, and the remnants of the once great box–ironbark forests lie in a wide arc from west of Stawell to east of Wangaratta. During the gold rush, huge areas of forest were cut to provide wood for fuel and building. Forests were also cleared for agriculture, particularly in the more fertile plains and valleys. The remaining forests are fragmented, putting native species such as the Brush-tailed Phascogale, Squirrel Glider and Regent Honeyeater at risk of extinction.

Dry Forest IN VICTORIA

Dry Forest Map
Remaining area
Remaining area
Lost since 1750
Lost since 1750

Base map courtesy of the Department of Sustainability and Environment

REGIONAL ANIMALS

Animals from the Victorian Dry Forest

Tree GoannaSquirrel GliderLittle Forest BatRegent Honeyeater

Related Resources

Photograph of a yellow plastic Tyranasaurus Rex