Weaving workshop

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by John Patten
Publish date
5 April 2016
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Wednesday 30 March, Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum hosted a weaving workshop over two sessions, delivered by acclaimed Gunditjmara artist, Bronwyn Razem. With weaving being one of the world’s most universal forms of cultural and artistic expression, the workshop was an opportunity for Bunjilaka visitors to celebrate the contributions made to the art form by Victoria’s First Peoples.

Weaving and hand Weaving workshop.
Image: John Patten
Source: John Patten
 

In each workshop session visitors were able to explore basic weaving techniques, forming the basis for the construction of a small woven ‘tidda basket’. The technique might seem simple in theory, however as the participants discovered, it takes some time to master. By the end of the day every participant was able to produce the beginnings of a beautiful work of art and everyone was provided with materials to continue their journey into weaving back at home.

Woman with straw Weaving workshop.
Image: John Patten
Source: John Patten
 

In addition to basket weaving, participants were also taught how to make woven toys using hay and wool. The participants poured a great deal of time and concentration into the production of their toys. The result of this effort was a range of beautiful toy animals inclusive of camp dogs, goannas, and a wombat who was crowned a general favourite of the day’s participants.

Woven items Weaving workshop.
Image: John Patten
Source: John Patten
 

Despite Bronwyn’s warning that she is a hard taskmaster as a teacher, we never saw the “dragon lady” that was lurking inside. Everyone had a great day, shared plenty of laughter and gained important incite from Bronwyn’s approach to teaching.

Bunjilaka’s regular Cultural Workshop Series include weaving, wood carving and other traditional and contemporary aspects of Koorie culture. For information on our upcoming workshops keep an eye on the Bunjilaka website or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

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